Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Drexel University, Hebrew University launch research consortium

November 12th, 2013
The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia CEO Steven M. Altschuler, Drexel University President John A. Fry, and Hebrew University of Jerusalem President Menahem Ben-Sasson signed a research agreement on November 11 as part of Philadelphia Mayor Michael A. Nutter's trade mission to Israel. The research partnership is designed to focus on pediatric translational research and to develop a collaborative platform for advancing pediatric medicine from the lab to the bedside.

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem hosted the signing ceremony, which took place at Jerusalem City Hall in the presence of Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat and Mayor Nutter.

"This international research consortium will leverage The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's success in medical innovation to treat pediatric diseases, with an emphasis on genetics and genomics," said Steven M. Altschuler, M.D., chief executive officer of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). "We are thrilled to collaborate with two exceptional institutions—Drexel University and Hebrew University's School of Pharmacy—whose expertise in technology and drug delivery respectively will create a unique partnership that enables high-quality, rapid advancement of new treatments in pediatric medicine for children around the world."

"This agreement sets the stage for a collaborative research consortium in fields of mutual interest, including pediatric translational research," said John A. Fry, president of Drexel University. "I'm glad to see our longstanding partnership with Hebrew University of Jerusalem expand, as we create a unique opportunity to address unmet needs in pediatrics through innovative commercial pediatric therapeutics and diagnostics."

One of the first outcomes of the research collaboration will be a conference to be held in Philadelphia in January 2014. The conference will provide the opportunity for investigators from the three institutions to find collaborators with whom to develop joint projects and proposals in pediatric translational research and for interested funders to learn more about the potential for discovery that this collaborative consortium holds.

"The collaboration between Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Drexel University and Hebrew University researchers will create an excellent environment for translating basic science into practical applications," said Prof. Menahem Ben-Sasson, president of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. "This important agreement will bring our institutions' extensive and proven research capabilities to bear on developing real-world therapies that enhance the lives of young people everywhere."

Nutter and his delegation arrived in Tel Aviv on November 7th as part of a trade mission to the United Kingdom and Israel. The signing on November 11 was a focal point of the trip.

"I am proud to see two great Philadelphia institutions, CHOP and Drexel University, expand their reach overseas," said Mayor Nutter. "The partnership with Hebrew University will allow all three parties to share research and ultimately improve children's healthcare."

Provided by Drexel University

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