Kraus to receive 2013 Gene D. Cohen Award

August 15th, 2013
The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) and the National Center for Creative Aging (NCCA) have chosen Nina Kraus, PhD, of Northwestern University as the 2013 recipient of the Gene D. Cohen Research Award in Creativity and Aging.

This award recognizes and honors the seminal work of Gene Cohen, MD, whose research in the field of creativity and aging shifted the conceptual focus from a problem paradigm to one of promise and potential. Cohen inspired individuals to approach longevity asking what wonders can be achieved, not in spite of age, but because of age. The award is presented annually to a professional whose research in the field of creativity and aging demonstrates these positive attributes.

The award presentation will take place at GSA's 66th Annual Scientific Meeting, which will be held from November 20 to 24 in New Orleans. This conference is organized to foster interdisciplinary collaboration among researchers, educators, and practitioners who specialize in the study of the aging process. Visit http://www.geron.org/annualmeeting for further details.

Kraus is a professor of neurobiology & physiology and otolaryngology, and the Hugh Knowles Chair at Northwestern University, where she also directs the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory.

She investigates the neurobiology underlying speech and music perception and learning-associated brain plasticity. This involves studies of listeners throughout the lifespan, clinical populations, and musicians.

Kraus has pioneered the use of a biological approach that reveals how auditory signals are encoded by a hub of cognitive and sensory influences. This approach reveals the fidelity of the brain's encoding of sound and the impact of experience. She has discovered biological mechanisms of aging and how software-based training and musical experience positively impact the adult brain.

Provided by The Gerontological Society of America

This Phys.org Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization mentioned above and is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from Phys.Org staff.

More news stories

Research helps identify memory molecules

A newly discovered method of identifying the creation of proteins in the body could lead to new insights into how learning and memories are impaired in Alzheimer's disease.

Clean air halves health costs in Chinese city

Air pollution regulations over the last decade in Taiyuan, China, have substantially improved the health of people living there, accounting for a greater than 50% reduction in costs associated with loss of life and disability ...

Netflix unveils new way to share recommendations

Netflix is giving its Internet video subscribers a more discreet way to recommend movies and TV shows to their Facebook friends after realizing most people don't want to share their viewing habits with large audiences.

How bubble studies benefit science and engineering

The image above shows a perfect bubble imploding in weightlessness. This bubble, and many like it, are produced by the researchers from the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland. What ...