New Innovative Technology for Low Cost Monatomic Hydrogen and Biofuels

July 22nd, 2013
Hydrogen fuel cells are emerging as key players in the clean energy landscape of the future, except for one problem: it takes a lot of energy to make hydrogen (H2-molecular), and here in the US, the preferred source of that energy appears to be fresh water, an un-reliable, expensive and scarce critical life giving resource.

That's hardly a sustainable solution considering fresh water which is used for farming, households, and the support of the world's populations.

API researchers have been turning their attention to renewable energy for producing rare low-cost Monatomic Hydrogen and Biofuels from Seawater, Biomass, and Natural Gas.

The most recent development is a low-cost ECP-AMF dissociation plasma physics technology that can produce extremely high volumes of monatomic hydrogen.

Electro Magnetically Coupled – Atomic Mass Filtering (ECP-AMF) developed by Advanced Plasma Industries Inc. can dissociate Sea Water, Biomass materials (wood, grass, wheat, corn, algae, etc.), Coal and Natural gas into Monatomic hydrogen (1H = 3.5 times the energy of regular market hydrogen H2-molecular).

The process then takes the monatomic hydrogen and carbon and re-associates the elements to manufacture synthetic hydrocarbons like kerosene, diesel, gasoline, and lubricating oil at prices well below current market prices.

A SAFE, CLEAN, AND ABUNDANT Renewable Energy.

Electro Magnetically Coupled – Atomic Mass Filtering (ECP-AMF) uses solar, wind, hydroelectric, nuclear input energy to power the dissociation of sea water, coal, natural gas, or biomass molecules into monatomic hydrogen, carbon oxygen, and many other atomic species as required.

ECP-AMF produces renewable ready to use fuels, thereby, having a huge impact on energy markets by providing a path to cost-competitive clean fuels needed for combustion engines, jet fuels, fuel cells, and power plants.

That in turn would give the world's energy industries a low-cost, alternative to conventional fuels that would be SAFER, CLEANER, AND ABUNDANT.

The techniology has been evaluated by DOE, DOD, and US Army Corp. of Engineers.

API expects to complete their first prototype in the the fourth quarter of 2014.


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