MARC travel awards announced for the AAI 2013 Advanced Course in Immunology Meeting

June 26th, 2013
FASEB MARC (Maximizing Access to Research Careers) Program has announced the travel award recipients for the American Association of Immunologists 2013 Advanced Course in Immunology meeting in Boston, MA from July 28-August 2, 2013. These awards are meant to promote the entry of students, postdoctorates and scientists from underrepresented groups into the mainstream of the basic science community and to encourage the participation of young scientists at the American Association of Immunologists meeting.

Awards are given to poster/platform presenters and faculty mentors paired with the students/trainees they mentor. This year MARC conferred 6 awards totaling $11,100.

The FASEB MARC Program is funded by a grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, National Institutes of Health. A primary goal of the MARC Program is to increase the number and competitiveness of underrepresented minorities engaged in biomedical and behavioral research.

POSTER/ORAL PRESENTERS (FASEB MARC PROGRAM)
Mark Barnes, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine/Case Western Reserve University

Dr. Raimon Duran-Struuck, Columbia University [AAI member]

Dr. Azure Faucette, Wayne State University [AAI member]

Samantha Garcia, Thomas Jefferson University [AAI member]

Jose Suarez-Martinez, Michigan State University [AAI member]

Jaleisa Turner, Washington University in St. Louis [AAI member]

Provided by Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

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