Joslin's Susan Bonner-Weir, Ph.D., named American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow

February 14th, 2013
February 15, 2013 – Susan Bonner-Weir, Ph.D., Senior Investigator in the Section on Islet Cell & Regenerative Biology at the Joslin Diabetes Center and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers and is awarded on the basis of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. Dr. Bonner-Weird is being honored for her major contributions in the areas of architecture and function of the islet, in vivo regulation of β-cell mass, and islet growth and differentiation.

According to George King, M.D., Chief Scientific Officer at Joslin, "Dr. Bonner-Weir has provided landmark contributions to the understanding on the changes in pancreatic beta cells with diabetes. Her collegial reputation on collaboration is well known and has helped to propel this field greatly."

"This is such an honor," said Dr. Bonner-Weir. "I've had enormous pleasure delving in the fascinating science of the pancreatic beta cell, which hopefully will lead to help for people with diabetes."

Formal presentation of the award will be made during the AAAS Fellows Forum at the 2013 AAAS Annual Meeting, September 16, in Boston, MA.

Provided by Joslin Diabetes Center

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