Precise Point Positioning and real-time positioning accuracy for COMPASS satellite navigation

February 5th, 2013
Precise Point Positioning and real-time positioning accuracy for COMPASS satellite navigation
This shows co-located receivers PPP time series in different areas. Red, green and blue points represent errors for the East (E), North (N) and Height (U) components. The base-line for the three co-located receivers in a row is less than 10 m. Three rows present the PPP time series for the north, south and west of the regional service area. Credit: ©Science China Press
COMPASS uses the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) and Inclined Geosynchronous Satellite Orbit (IGSO) satellites, which are more suitable for regional services. Its constellation is composed of 14 satellites, including 5 GEO, 5 IGSO satellites and 4 Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. As of 2012, 13 satellites have been launched. Except for G2 (unusable) and M1 (testing only), the remaining 11 satellites, including 4GEO+5IGSO+2MEO, have successfully transmitted signals and broadcasted navigational messages, to prepare for full operation starting in 2013.

Positioning accuracy assessment for the 4GEO/5IGSO/2MEO constellation of COMPASS is published in Science China-Phys Mech Astron, 2012, 55(12). The accuracy of precise point positioning (PPP) and real-time positioning is assessed for the adopted dataset from the 4GEO/5IGSO/2MEO constellation. This paper is co-authored by Zhou Shanshi, Cao Yueling from Shanghai Astronomical Observatory and Zhou Jianhua from Beijing Global Information Application and Development Center.

Precise Point Positioning and real-time positioning accuracy for COMPASS satellite navigation
This shows positioning errors of a dual-frequency receiver at Zhengzhou in the open (left) and authorized (right) services. Top subplot: red, green and blue lines are errors for the east-west, north-south and height components. Middle subplot: 3-dimensional positioning errors. Lower subplot: pink, blue and black lines are DOP values for the east-west, north-south and height components. Bottom subplot: red line is the PDOP value and black line the number of satellites in view. Credit: ©Science China Press

Two positioning services can be provided by the satellite navigation system, post-processing PPP and real-time single point positioning. Current positioning accuracy has reached millimeter levels for GPS static points, and meter levels for real-time navigation users. Additional satellite-based or ground-based augmentation systems are built to improve the accuracy and integrity of the GNSS service. One unique design of the COMPASS system is that it simultaneously provides open service and authorized service using the same control and operation segment. To expand the COMPASS satellite navigation system, it is necessary to assess the accuracy of both PPP and real-time positioning.

This study describes the challenges of orbit determination (OD) for the COMPASS constellation and the OD strategy. For geodetic users the PPP strategy and accuracy are discussed. To evaluate the PPP accuracy, coordinate time series repeatability and discrepancies with GPS precise positioning, are computed. Experiments show that the COMPASS PPP repeatability for the East, North and Up components of a receiver within mainland China are better than 2 cm, 2 cm and 5 cm (see Figure 1). Apparent systematic offsets of several centimeters exist between COMPASS precise positioning and GPS precise positioning, indicating errors remain in the treatment of COMPASS measurement and dynamic models, and reference frame differences exist between the two systems.

For common positioning users, COMPASS provides both open and authorized services with rapid differential corrections and integrity information available to authorized users. Our assessment shows that in open service, positioning accuracy for dual-frequency and single-frequency users is about 5 m and 6 m (RMS), which may be improved to about 3 m and 4 m (RMS) with the addition of differential correction (see Figure 2). In addition, less accurate Signal In Space User Ranging Error (SIS URE) and Geometric Dilution of Precision (GDOP), contribute to the relatively inferior accuracy of COMPASS compared to GPS.

More information:
Zhou S S, Cao Y L, Zhou J H, et al. Positioning accuracy assessment for the 4GEO/5IGSO/2MEO constellation of COMPASS. Sci China-Phys Mech Astron, 2012, 55(12): 2290-2299, doi: 10.1007/s11433-012-4942-z

Provided by Science China Press

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