Revolutionary paper tablet computer revealed: Thin and flexible as sheets of paper

January 9th, 2013
(Phys.org)—Watch out tablet lovers – a flexible paper computer developed at Queen's University in collaboration with Plastic Logic and Intel Labs will revolutionize the way people work with tablets and computers.

The PaperTab tablet looks and feels just like a sheet of . However, it is fully interactive with a flexible, high-resolution 10.7-inch plastic display developed by and a flexible touchscreen. It is powered by the second generation I5 developed by Intel.

Instead of using several apps or windows on a single display, users have ten or more interactive displays or "PaperTabs": one per app in use.

"Using several PaperTabs makes it much easier to work with multiple documents," says Roel Vertegaal, Director of Queen's University's Human Media Lab. "Within five to ten years, most computers, from ultra-notebooks to tablets, will look and feel just like these sheets of printed color paper."

"We are actively exploring disruptive user experiences. The 'PaperTab' project, developed by the Human Media Lab at Queen's University and Plastic Logic, demonstrates novel interactions powered by Intel processors that could potentially delight tablet users in the future," says Intel's Experience Design Lead Research Scientist, Ryan Brotman.

PaperTab's intuitive interface allows users to create a larger drawing or display surface by placing two or more PaperTabs side by side. PaperTab emulates the natural handling of multiple sheets of paper. It can file and display thousands of , replacing the need for a computer monitor and stacks of papers or printouts.

Unlike traditional tablets, PaperTabs keep track of their location relative to each other, and to the user, providing a seamless experience across all apps, as if they were physical computer windows.

"Plastic Logic's flexible plastic displays allow a natural with , being lighter, thinner and more robust compared with today's standard glass-based displays. This is just one example of the innovative revolutionary design approaches enabled by flexible displays," explains Indro Mukerjee, CEO of Plastic Logic.

Queen's University's Human Media Lab and Plastic Logic revealed PaperTab to the press at the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES 2013) in Las Vegas on January 8.

Provided by Queen's University

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