Davide Gaiotto and Stephen Hawking among Fundamental Physics Prize Foundation award winners

December 11th, 2012
Davide Gaiotto, a Perimeter Institute faculty member, and Stephen Hawking, a Perimeter Distinguished Visiting Research Chair, along with other celebrated physicists, have been awarded prizes from the Fundamental Physics Prize Foundation. Gaiotto has won a $100,000 New Horizons in Physics Prize for emerging work as a young researcher, and Stephen Hawking was awarded a $3 million Fundamental Physics Prize for his work on black holes.

"Perimeter Institute is thrilled that two of its researchers have today been recognised with these major international awards," said Neil Turok, Director of Perimeter Institute. "Stephen's path-breaking discoveries about the quantum properties of black holes set the agenda for much of fundamental physics and cosmology over the past three decades. Davide's discoveries about quantum fields are likewise opening the way to more powerful mathematical descriptions of particles and forces in the universe."

More information:
http://www.perimeterinstitute.ca/news/perimeter-congratulates-davide-gaiotto-and-stephen-hawking-receiving-awards-fundamental-physics

Provided by Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

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