Davide Gaiotto and Stephen Hawking among Fundamental Physics Prize Foundation award winners

December 11th, 2012
Davide Gaiotto, a Perimeter Institute faculty member, and Stephen Hawking, a Perimeter Distinguished Visiting Research Chair, along with other celebrated physicists, have been awarded prizes from the Fundamental Physics Prize Foundation. Gaiotto has won a $100,000 New Horizons in Physics Prize for emerging work as a young researcher, and Stephen Hawking was awarded a $3 million Fundamental Physics Prize for his work on black holes.

"Perimeter Institute is thrilled that two of its researchers have today been recognised with these major international awards," said Neil Turok, Director of Perimeter Institute. "Stephen's path-breaking discoveries about the quantum properties of black holes set the agenda for much of fundamental physics and cosmology over the past three decades. Davide's discoveries about quantum fields are likewise opening the way to more powerful mathematical descriptions of particles and forces in the universe."

More information:
www.perimeterinstitute.ca/news/perimeter-congratulates-davide-gaiotto-and-stephen-hawking-receiving-awards-fundamental-physics

Provided by Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics

This Phys.org Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization mentioned above and is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from Phys.Org staff.

More news stories

Researchers first to create a single-molecule diode

Under the direction of Latha Venkataraman, associate professor of applied physics at Columbia Engineering, researchers have designed a new technique to create a single-molecule diode, and, in doing so, they ...

Engineering phase changes in nanoparticle arrays

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have just taken a big step toward the goal of engineering dynamic nanomaterials whose structure and associated properties can be ...

Location matters in the lowland Amazon

You know the old saying: Location, location, location? It turns out that it applies to the Amazon rainforest, too. New work from Carnegie's Greg Asner illustrates a hidden tapestry of chemical variation across ...