17th International Conference on Cold Fusion Held in KAIST, South Korea

August 14th, 2012
The 17th International Conference on Cold Fusion (ICCF-17) is being held in the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) in Daejeon this week from August 12th through August 17th.

More than 150 scientists from around the world participate in the conference by making oral and poster presentations. Several theories on cold fusion that are under development will be discussed. A few companies that are working on commercial devices for cold fusion will be presenting their results, and a separate session on commercialization will be held on the last day of the conference.

Large companies are beginning to take notice of the recent results on cold fusion as evidenced by the real-time demonstration of a working cell developed by Professor Francesco Celani from Italy, which was introduced last week at the National Instruments Conference in Austin, Texas. Approximately 5,000 people attended the conference. The National Instruments arranged to air-ship the cell to Korea, and they are providing technical support for the demonstration during the ICCF-17.

The potential impact of cold fusion is huge. Energy was approximately 10% of the total world gross domestic product of $60 trillion in 2006 (US Energy Information Administration 2009). The current world power use is 16 Terra Watts, and it would have to grow to 60 Terra Watts for everyone to enjoy western European standards of living. Experimental evidence suggests that this nuclear energy source has the potential to provide abundant, low cost energy without the production of greenhouse gasses or long-term hazardous waste. The minimal radiation detected from experiments can be easily shielded.

Provided by The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)

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