Printed photonic crystal mirrors enable membrane lasers on silicon

July 23rd, 2012
UT Arlington professor Cheng Luo can envision the day that a flexible cell phone could be folded and placed in a pocket like a billfold or that a laptop computer could be rolled up and stored.

Through an active $300,000 National Science Foundation grant, the mechanical and aerospace engineering professor is developing a process called “micropunching lithography.” The process is used to create lightweight, low-cost and more flexible polymer-based devices that have the potential to replace silicon-based material commonly used in computers and other electronic devices.

Luo’s work was recently published in the June 2012 North America edition of International Innovation. His project has garnered three grants totaling about $700,000.

“Practical applications for these microstructures could be in everything from glucose monitoring and delivery of chemicals in treating water pipes,” Luo said.

Micropunching lithography involves two operations: cutting and drawing. Luo said in these two operations polymers are deformed using rigid and soft molds, respectively, creating desired polymer channels and sidewalls that can be used for detection and delivery.

Erian Armanios, chairman of the UT Arlington Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department, said Luo’s process has diverse applications.

“These microstructures of conducting polymers could be used as sensors and actuators for engineering and biomedical applications,” Armanios said.

Luo joined the UT Arlington College of Engineering in 2007 and has focused his research on mechanics, microfabrication and nanofabrication, particularly with biomedical applications.

Provided by University of Texas at Arlington

This Phys.org Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization mentioned above and is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from Phys.Org staff.

More news stories

US seeks China's help after cyberattack

The United States is asking China for help as it weighs potential responses to a cyberattack against Sony Pictures Entertainment that the U.S. has blamed on North Korea.

Off-world manufacturing is a go with space printer

On Friday, the BBC reported on a NASA email exchange with a space station which involved astronauts on the International Space Station using their 3-D printer to make a wrench from instructions sent up in ...

Ancient clay seals may shed light on biblical era

Impressions from ancient clay seals found at a small site in Israel east of Gaza are signs of government in an area thought to be entirely rural during the 10th century B.C., says Mississippi State University archaeologist ...

Hopes, fears, doubts surround Cuba's oil future

One of the most prolific oil and gas basins on the planet sits just off Cuba's northwest coast, and the thaw in relations with the United States is giving rise to hopes that Cuba can now get in on the action.

Why the Sony hack isn't big news in Japan

Japan's biggest newspaper, Yomiuri Shimbun, featured a story about Sony Corp. on its website Friday. It wasn't about hacking. It was about the company's struggling tablet business.

Recorded Ebola deaths top 7,000

The worst Ebola outbreak on record has now killed more than 7,000 people, with many of the latest deaths reported in Sierra Leone, the World Health Organization said as United Nations Secretary-General Ban ...