Gladstone investigator Shinya Yamanaka receives Millennium Technology Award

June 13th, 2012
Gladstone Institutes Senior Investigator Shinya Yamanaka, MD, PhD, has won the Millennium Technology Award Grand Prize, the world's largest and most prominent technology award.

This award recognizes Dr. Yamanaka's discovery of a way to turn adult skin cells into cells that act like embryonic stem cells. This discovery has since altered the fields of cell biology and stem cell research, offering new hope for the future of both personalized and regenerative medicine.

Dr. Yamanaka and Linus Torvalds, creator of Linux, were named laureates—or finalists—for the 2012 prize in April. For the first time in the award's history, both laureates were named joint Grand Prize winners today by the President of the Republic of Finland. Dr. Yamanaka and Mr. Torvalds will share 1.2 million Euros.

Six years ago, Dr. Yamanaka discovered that altering the genes of adult skin cells in mice allowed him to induce the cells into becoming like embryonic stem cells. He called them induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells. In 2007, he announced that he had done the same with human adult skin cells.

"Scientists all over the world are using Dr. Yamanaka's method to create stem cells and making great strides in research," said Dr. Ainomaija Haarla, president of Technology Academy Finland. "His achievement has had a great impact on research in medicine and biotechnology as pluripotent stem cells are already being used for medical drug testing and the growth of implant tissues. Dr. Yamanaka is unquestionably the father of this innovation."

Many see iPS cell technology as an entirely new platform for fundamental studies of human disease. Rather than using disease models made in yeast, flies or mice for research, iPS technology lets scientists create human stem cells from the skin cells of patients with a specific disease. As a result, the iPS cells contain a complete set of the genes that resulted in that disease—representing the potential of a far-superior human model for studying disease development, new drugs and treatments. In the future, iPS cells could be used to test both drug safety and efficacy for an individual patient.

The Millennium Technology Prize is Finland's tribute to technological innovation that significantly improves the quality of human life today and for future generations. Notable past recipients include Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the World Wide Web, Professor Shuji Nakamura, inventor of revolutionary light sources, Professor Robert Langer, inventor of biomaterials for controlled drug release and tissue regeneration and Professor Michael Grätzel, inventor of dye-sensitized solar cells.

"I am both honored to receive this prestigious award and humbled to be in the company of such great innovators," said Dr. Yamanaka, who is also a professor of anatomy at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), with which Gladstone is affiliated. "The 21st century holds much promise to fight such devastating conditions as heart disease and Alzheimer's disease—but as researchers and physicians we must continue to innovate new solutions that will help improve the lives of millions worldwide affected by these and many other diseases."

Dr. Yamanaka is also the director of the Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA) and a professor at the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), both located at Kyoto University. Two decades ago, Dr. Yamanaka was an orthopedic surgeon practicing in Japan. In 1993, he began his postdoctoral training at Gladstone to become a research scientist. Dr. Yamanaka has received numerous honors recognizing the importance of his iPS discovery, including the Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award, the Shaw Prize and the Kyoto Prize for Advanced Technology. In April 2012, Dr. Yamanaka was inducted into the National Academy of Sciences, garnering one of the highest honors available for U.S. scientists and engineers.

Provided by Gladstone Institutes

This Phys.org Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization mentioned above and is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from Phys.Org staff.

More news stories

Modi wields broom in new 'Clean India' push

Prime Minister Narendra Modi wielded a broom in a New Delhi slum on Thursday as he pledged to sweep away India's reputation for poor public hygiene and rudimentary sanitation.

Gov't website for doc payments not up to snuff

The government's new "Open Payments" website is intended to let you find out whether your doctor is getting freebies, travel or other financial benefits from drug companies and medical device manufacturers. But it doesn't ...

Australia lifts Ebola donation to $16 million

Australia more than doubled its donation to the fight against Ebola in West Africa to 18 million Australian dollars ($16 million) on Thursday, but resisted demands to send personnel.

US hunts contacts of seriously ill Ebola patient

US health officials scoured the Dallas area Wednesday for people—including schoolchildren—who came in contact with a Liberian man who was diagnosed with Ebola, as it emerged a hospital mix-up saw him initially turned ...

The origins of handedness in life

Handedness is a complicated business. To simply say life is left-handed doesn't even begin to capture the blooming hierarchy of binary refinements it continues to evolve. Over the years there have been numerous ...

New frontier in error-correcting codes

Error-correcting codes are one of the glories of the information age: They're what guarantee the flawless transmission of digital information over the airwaves or through copper wire, even in the presence of the corrupting ...