Gladstone investigator Shinya Yamanaka receives Millennium Technology Award

June 13th, 2012
Gladstone Institutes Senior Investigator Shinya Yamanaka, MD, PhD, has won the Millennium Technology Award Grand Prize, the world's largest and most prominent technology award.

This award recognizes Dr. Yamanaka's discovery of a way to turn adult skin cells into cells that act like embryonic stem cells. This discovery has since altered the fields of cell biology and stem cell research, offering new hope for the future of both personalized and regenerative medicine.

Dr. Yamanaka and Linus Torvalds, creator of Linux, were named laureates—or finalists—for the 2012 prize in April. For the first time in the award's history, both laureates were named joint Grand Prize winners today by the President of the Republic of Finland. Dr. Yamanaka and Mr. Torvalds will share 1.2 million Euros.

Six years ago, Dr. Yamanaka discovered that altering the genes of adult skin cells in mice allowed him to induce the cells into becoming like embryonic stem cells. He called them induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells. In 2007, he announced that he had done the same with human adult skin cells.

"Scientists all over the world are using Dr. Yamanaka's method to create stem cells and making great strides in research," said Dr. Ainomaija Haarla, president of Technology Academy Finland. "His achievement has had a great impact on research in medicine and biotechnology as pluripotent stem cells are already being used for medical drug testing and the growth of implant tissues. Dr. Yamanaka is unquestionably the father of this innovation."

Many see iPS cell technology as an entirely new platform for fundamental studies of human disease. Rather than using disease models made in yeast, flies or mice for research, iPS technology lets scientists create human stem cells from the skin cells of patients with a specific disease. As a result, the iPS cells contain a complete set of the genes that resulted in that disease—representing the potential of a far-superior human model for studying disease development, new drugs and treatments. In the future, iPS cells could be used to test both drug safety and efficacy for an individual patient.

The Millennium Technology Prize is Finland's tribute to technological innovation that significantly improves the quality of human life today and for future generations. Notable past recipients include Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the World Wide Web, Professor Shuji Nakamura, inventor of revolutionary light sources, Professor Robert Langer, inventor of biomaterials for controlled drug release and tissue regeneration and Professor Michael Grätzel, inventor of dye-sensitized solar cells.

"I am both honored to receive this prestigious award and humbled to be in the company of such great innovators," said Dr. Yamanaka, who is also a professor of anatomy at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), with which Gladstone is affiliated. "The 21st century holds much promise to fight such devastating conditions as heart disease and Alzheimer's disease—but as researchers and physicians we must continue to innovate new solutions that will help improve the lives of millions worldwide affected by these and many other diseases."

Dr. Yamanaka is also the director of the Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA) and a professor at the Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), both located at Kyoto University. Two decades ago, Dr. Yamanaka was an orthopedic surgeon practicing in Japan. In 1993, he began his postdoctoral training at Gladstone to become a research scientist. Dr. Yamanaka has received numerous honors recognizing the importance of his iPS discovery, including the Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award, the Shaw Prize and the Kyoto Prize for Advanced Technology. In April 2012, Dr. Yamanaka was inducted into the National Academy of Sciences, garnering one of the highest honors available for U.S. scientists and engineers.

Provided by Gladstone Institutes

This Phys.org Science News Wire page contains a press release issued by an organization mentioned above and is provided to you “as is” with little or no review from Phys.Org staff.

More news stories

How the hummingbird achieves its aerobatic feats

(Phys.org) —The sight of a tiny hummingbird hovering in front of a flower and then darting to another with lightning speed amazes and delights. But it also leaves watchers with a persistent question: How ...

'Mind the gap' between atomically thin materials

In subway stations around London, the warning to "Mind the Gap" helps commuters keep from stepping into empty space as they leave the train. When it comes to engineering single-layer atomic structures, minding ...

Health care M&A leads global deal surge

In a big year for deal making, the health care industry is a standout. Large drugmakers are buying and selling businesses to control costs and deploy surplus cash. A rising stock market, tax strategies and ...

Can robots help stop the Ebola outbreak?

The US military has enlisted a new germ-killing weapon in the fight against Ebola—a four-wheeled robot that can disinfect a room in minutes with pulses of ultraviolet light.

Seychelles poachers go nutty for erotic shaped seed

Under cover of darkness in the steamy jungles of the Seychelles thieves creep out to harvest the sizeable and valuable nuts of the famous coco de mer palm, and their activities are threatening its long-term ...

New bird flu case in Germany

A worrying new strain of bird flu has been observed for the first time in a wild bird in northern Germany, the agriculture ministry said Saturday.

LiquidPiston unveils quiet X Mini engine prototype

LiquidPiston has a new X Mini engine which is a small 70 cubic centimeter gasoline powered "prototype. This is a quiet, four-stroke engine with near-zero vibration. The company said it can bring improvements ...