$2 million commitment from RBC launches Queen's University watershed project

June 8th, 2012
RBC has donated $2 million to support the new RBC Queen's University Water Initiative. The new initiative aims at raising awareness of the impact of industrial development and agriculture on watershed health and water supplies.

"RBC's generous donation will contribute to Queen's lasting impact on water protection through research, education and the training of tomorrow's professionals," says Queen's University Principal Daniel Woolf. "Learning acquired by doing is an important aspect of the Queen's experience. This initiative will provide practical hands-on watershed research experience for our faculty, graduate and undergraduate researchers. "

The RBC Queen's University Water Initiative is a ten-year program taking a holistic approach to understanding the fragility of watershed resources.

"We're proud to support this new initiative that will bring together the brightest minds to tackle some of the most serious water issues facing our country," said Gordon M. Nixon, president and CEO, RBC. "Our $2 million grant is one of the largest commitments we have made under the RBC Blue Water Project and is a testament to our confidence in Queen's University."

The RBC Blue Water Project is a ten-year, $50 million philanthropic commitment to support organizations that are committed to watershed protection and providing access to clean drinking water. Since 2007, RBC has committed more than $33 million in single and multi-year grants to over 500 organizations worldwide. RBC is recognized among the world's financial, social and environmental leaders. In 2011, RBC contributed more than $98 million to community causes worldwide, through donations of more than $64 million, and an additional $34 million in sponsorship of community events and national organizations.

Provided by Queen's University

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