The Gerontological Society of America Selects 2012 Fellows

June 7th, 2012
The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) — the nation's largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging — has named 38 exemplary professionals as its newest fellows.

The status of fellow — the highest class of membership within the Society — is an acknowledgment of outstanding and continuing work in gerontology. This recognition can come at varying points in an individual's career and can acknowledge a broad scope of activity. This includes research, teaching, administration, public service, practice, and notable participation within the organization. Fellows are chosen from each of GSA's four membership sections.

The new fellows will be formally recognized during GSA's 65th Annual Scientific Meeting, which will be held from November 14 to 18 in San Diego. Full details of this conference are available at www.geron.org/annualmeeting.

Biological Sciences Section

Esther E. Dupont-Versteegden, PhD, University of Kentucky; Heidi A. Tissenbaum, PhD, University of Massachusetts Medical School; John Tower, PhD, University of Southern California; Elena Volpi, MD, PhD, University of Texas Medical Branch; David J. Waters, DVM, PhD, Purdue University

Behavioral and Social Sciences Section

David Almeida, PhD, Pennsylvania State University; Sara L. Arber, PhD, University of Surrey; Kate M. Bennett, PhD, University Of Liverpool; Paula C. Carder, PhD, Portland State University; Michelle C. Carlson, PhD, Johns Hopkins University; Susan Turk Charles, PhD, University of California, Irvine; Laura H. Coker, PhD, Wake Forest School of Medicine; Ingrid A. Connidis, PhD, University of Western Ontario; Jessica A. Kelley-Moore, PhD, Case Western Reserve University; T.J. McCallum, PhD, Case Western Reserve University; Christopher R. Phillipson, PhD, Keele University; Gary T. Reker, PhD, Trent University; Ken R. Smith, PhD, University of Utah; JoNell Strough, PhD, West Virginia University; Roland J. Thorpe, PhD, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Rebecca L. Utz, PhD, University of Utah; Kimberly S. Van Haitsma, PhD, Madlyn and Leonard Abramson Center for Jewish Life

Health Sciences Section

Alice F. Bonner, PhD, RN, GNP, FAANP, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services; Mary Cadogan, RN, DrPh, CGNP, University of Calfornia, Los Angeles; Kirsten Corazzini, PhD, Duke University Medical Center; Rebecca L. Davis, PhD, RN, Grand Valley State University; Karen S. Dunn, PhD, RN, Oakland University; Cheryl Riley-Doucet, PhD, RN, Oakland University; Janet Specht, PhD, RN, FAAN, University of Iowa; Margaret I. Wallhagen, PhD, GNP-BC, AGSF, FAAN, University of California, San Francisco

Social Research, Policy, and Practice Section

Maria P. Aranda, PhD, University of Southern California; Patricia J. Kolb, PhD; Lehman College; Edward A. Miller, PhD, University of Massachusetts Boston; Joseph G. Pickard, LCSW, PhD, University of Missouri–St. Louis; Michelle M. Putnam, PhD, Simmons College; Jane K. Straker, PhD, Miami University; Joshua M. Wiener, PhD, RTI International; Scott D. Wright, PhD, University of Utah

Provided by The Gerontological Society of America

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