ASTRO honored with 2 Hermes Awards

June 4th, 2012
The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) has been honored with two 2012 Hermes Creative Awards from the Association of Marketing and Communication Professionals (AMCP) for its work on the fall 2011 edition of ASTROnews and the Radiation Therapy for Cancer brochure. This is the sixth year in a row that ASTRO has received Hermes Awards.

The Hermes Creative Awards is an international competition for creative professionals involved in the concept, writing and design of traditional and emerging media. Entries come from corporate marketing and communication departments, advertising agencies, PR firms, design shops and freelancers.

There were over 4,700 entries from throughout the United States and several other countries in the 2012 competition. After two months of judging, the AMCP judges honored ASTROnews with the Gold Award in the Magazine category. The award is given for excellence in quality, creativity and resourcefulness. The Radiation Therapy for Cancer brochure received an Honorable Mention in the Brochure category for exceeding the high standards of the industry norm.

"Once again, our Communications Department has raised the bar on our publications," Laura Thevenot, ASTRO CEO, said. "These publications are essential for our membership and help to keep the Society and patients informed. It is such a privilege to receive these distinguished honors from the AMCP six years in a row."

Provided by American Society for Radiation Oncology

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