Science News w/ Video

An autopilot for steering flying windmills

The idea of using kites to collect the energy produced by high altitude winds has been gaining ground amidst the scientific community. EPFL researchers have developed an autopilot device to control and optimize ...

Nov 10, 2014
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Line dancing bacteria on a chip (w/ Video)

By changing the direction of a magnetic field, so-called magneto-tactic bacteria are able to make a full U-turn. They can be taught line dancing in this way, inside the tiny micro channels of a lab on a chip. ...

Nov 10, 2014
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New natural supplement relieves canine arthritis

Arthritis pain in dogs can be relieved, with no side effects, by a new product based on medicinal plants and dietary supplements that was developed at the University of Montreal's Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. "While acupuncture ...

Nov 10, 2014
4.8 / 5 (4) 2

'Big data' takes root in the world of plant research

Botanists at Trinity College Dublin have launched a database with information that documents significant 'life events' for nearly 600 plant species across the globe. They clubbed together with like-minded ...

Nov 09, 2014
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Five questions about the Rosetta mission

On November 12, the Rosetta spacecraft's Philae lander is due to land on the surface of a comet. As a space scientist working with those who have instruments on board, I can't wait. I met up with some of ...

Nov 07, 2014
4.6 / 5 (5) 1

Video: 3D-printing a lunar base

Could astronauts one day be printing rather than building a base on the Moon? In 2013 ESA, working with industrial partners, proved that 3D printing using lunar material was feasible in principle. Since then, work continues ...

Nov 07, 2014
5 / 5 (5) 1

What commercial aircraft will look like in 2050

The aircraft industry is expecting a seven-fold increase in air traffic by 2050, and a four-fold increase in greenhouse gas emissions unless fundamental changes are made. But just how "fundamental" will those ...

Nov 07, 2014
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Hungry bats compete for prey by jamming sonar

In their nightly forays, bats hunting for insects compete with as many as one million hungry roost-mates. A study published today in Science shows that Mexican free-tailed bats jam the sonar of competitors to gai ...

Nov 06, 2014
4.8 / 5 (4) 0