News tagged with surface tension

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Video: The anatomy of a raindrop

When asked to picture the shape of raindrops, many of us will imagine water looking like tears that fall from our eyes, or the stretched out drip from a leaky faucet. This popular misconception is often reinforced in weather ...

dateDec 11, 2013 in Earth Sciences
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Culinary biomimicry

(Phys.org) —As any chef knows, preparing good food is just physics, or was that chemistry? Either way, the state of the art in cooking increasingly looks to science for inspiration. Engineers at MIT have ...

dateOct 10, 2013 in Other report
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Rethinking surface tension

(Phys.org) —If you've ever watched a drop of water form into a bead or a water strider scoot across a pond, you are familiar with a property of liquids called surface tension.

dateAug 30, 2013 in General Physics
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Gravity waves and sunglint, lake superior

From the vantage point of the International Space Station, astronauts frequently observe atmospheric and surface phenomena in ways that are impossible to view from the ground. Two such phenomena—gravity ...

dateJul 23, 2013 in Earth Sciences
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'Watermark Ink' device wins R&D 100 Award

A device that can instantly identify unknown liquids based on their surface tension has been selected to receive the 2013 R&D 100 Award—known as "the Oscar of Innovation"—from R&D Magazine.

dateJul 08, 2013 in Nanophysics
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Water droplets prefer the soft touch

(Phys.org) —Researchers have found a way to drive water droplets along a flat surface without applying heat, chemicals, electricity, or other forces: All that's required is varying the stiffness of the ...

dateJun 25, 2013 in General Physics
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Spheres can form squares

Everybody who has tried to stack oranges in a box knows that a regular packing of spheres in a flat layer naturally leads to a hexagonal pattern, where each sphere is surrounded by six neighbours in a honeycomb-like ...

dateMay 24, 2013 in Soft Matter
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Non-wetting fabric drains sweat

(Phys.org) —Waterproof fabrics that whisk away sweat could be the latest application of microfluidic technology developed by bioengineers at the University of California, Davis.

dateMay 20, 2013 in Materials Science
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