News tagged with nectar

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Red light regulates nectar secretion

Flowering plants produce nectar to attract insect pollinators. Some plant species, such as Lima bean, also secrete nectar from so-called extrafloral nectaries to attract ants which in turn fend off herbivores. ...

Sep 27, 2010
5 / 5 (1) 1 | with audio podcast

Bees warm up with a drink, too

When we venture out on a cool morning, nothing energises our body like a nice warm drink and new research reveals that bees also use the same idea when they're feeling cold.

Aug 18, 2010
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When flowers turn up the heat

Could a "hot" flower attract pollinators by serving as a reward in a plant-pollinator mutualism? Many flowering plants produce nectar and pollen as rewards in exchange for pollination services by insects and other animals. ...

Jul 28, 2010
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Plant hormone regulates nectar production

Rapeseed is one of the ten most important agricultural crops worldwide. In spring, the rapeseed fields with their bright yellow flowers are widely visible: this year winter rapeseed is being cultivated on ...

Mar 29, 2010
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Drunk Bats Manage To Pass Sobriety Tests

(PhysOrg.com) -- New World Leaf-nosed bats (Chiroptera Phyllostomidae) are thriving in the tropical forests of Central and South America, even though their diets consist of more fruits and nectars than their ...

Feb 18, 2010 report
5 / 5 (4) 2 | with audio podcast

The almond tree's secret weapon

The nectar of the almond tree produces an extraordinary and dangerous poison. This is the only known plant to have this poison in its flowers' nectar. A study carried out at the University of Haifa has revealed that bees ...

Jan 28, 2010
4.4 / 5 (7) 0 | with audio podcast

Acacias use ants to guard flowers

(PhysOrg.com) -- Research by Dr Nigel Raine, Senior Lecturer in Animal Behaviour at Royal Holloway, University of London has revealed how a special plant-ant relationship thrives on give and take for mutual ...

Jan 04, 2010
5 / 5 (11) 0 | with audio podcast

New research explains orchids' sexual trickery

A new study reveals the reason why orchids use sexual trickery to lure insect pollinators. The study, published in the January issue of The American Naturalist, finds that sexual deception in orchids leads to a more effici ...

Dec 17, 2009
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