News tagged with impact craters

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Image: Messy peaks of Zucchius

Even to the naked eye, our Moon looks heavily cratered. The snippet of carved and pitted lunar surface shown in this image lies within a 66 km-wide crater known as Zucchius. From our perspective, Zucchius is located on the ...

dateJul 21, 2014 in Space Exploration
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Image: Sunlit side of the planet Mercury

Another day, another beautiful view of Mercury's horizon. In this scene, which was acquired looking from the shadows toward the sunlit side of the planet, a 120-km (75 mi.) impact crater stands out near the center. Emanating ...

dateOct 29, 2013 in Space Exploration
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Hidden Territory on Mercury Revealed

The MESSENGER spacecraft's third flyby of the planet Mercury has given scientists, for the first time, an almost complete view of the planet's surface and revealed some dramatic changes in Mercury's comet-like tail.

dateNov 04, 2009 in Space Exploration
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Man in the Moon has 'Graphite Whiskers'

Up to now scientists thought that the trace amounts of carbon on the surface of the Moon came from the solar wind. Now researchers at the Carnegie Institution's Geophysical Laboratory have detected and dated Moon carbon in ...

dateJul 01, 2010 in Space Exploration
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Finding alien worlds on Earth

Have you ever wondered which places on Earth most resemble other planets? For some of us, imagining the landscape of other worlds might just be for fun, but scientists and engineers wonder about what the otherworldly places ...

dateOct 18, 2013 in Space Exploration
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Exhumed rocks reveal Mars water ran deep

( -- By studying rocks blasted out of impact craters, ESA’s Mars Express has found evidence that underground water persisted at depth for prolonged periods during the first billion years of the Red Planet’s ...

dateJun 28, 2012 in Space Exploration
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Impacts could be boon for subterranean life

An incoming asteroid is trouble whether you're a dinosaur or a Bruce Willis fan. But microbes living deep underground may actually welcome the news, according to a recent study of an ancient impact in the Chesapeake Bay. ...

dateApr 16, 2012 in Space Exploration
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