News tagged with body temperatures

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Will climate change slow the Boston marathon?

(Phys.org) —In the middle of April, world attention focuses on the Boston Marathon. Researchers from the Biology and Earth and Environment Departments of Boston University have taken a new angle to provide novel insights ...

Mar 31, 2013
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Extreme work clothes for the Artic

Roughnecks working on oil and gas installations in the Arctic need clothes that monitor the health. Research scientists at SINTEF are developing a jacket with built-in sensors. It will monitor both body t ...

Mar 11, 2013
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Super gel stiffens when heated

It stiffens when heated and retains moisture a hundred times better than other gels. Chemists at Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands, have created a gel made from helical polymers. The molecules twist together to ...

Jan 23, 2013
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Global warming beneficial to ratsnakes

Speculation about how animals will respond to climate change due to global warming led University of Illinois researcher Patrick Weatherhead and his students to conduct a study of ratsnakes at three different ...

Jan 08, 2013
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Diving shrews -- heat before you leap

How does the world's smallest mammalian diver survive icy waters to catch its prey? A recent study of American water shrews to be presented at the Society for Experimental Biology meeting in Salzburg on 1st ...

Jul 03, 2012
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Global warming could kill off snails

(PhysOrg.com) -- Climate change models must be reworked in a bid to save some of the world’s smallest and slimiest creatures from extinction, a Flinders University PhD candidate warns.

Feb 07, 2012
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Blood-sucking mosquitoes keep their cool

No one likes being bitten by whining mosquitoes, but have you ever considered what the experience is like for them as their cold-blooded bodies fill with our warm blood? Now researchers reporting online on ...

Dec 15, 2011
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Men perspire, women glow

Women have to work harder than men in order to start sweating, while men are more effective sweaters during exercise, according to new research published in the journal Experimental Physiology.

Oct 08, 2010
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Taking the temperature of a dinosaur

Tyrannosaurus rex is often portrayed as a cold-blooded killer, but whether the Cretaceous-era dinosaur actually had a slow, reptilian-like metabolism or a faster, more bird-like metabolism is still a mystery.

Aug 24, 2010
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