1,500-year-old Byzantine port discovered

July 23rd, 2006 in Other Sciences / Archaeology & Fossils
1,500-year-old Byzantine port discovered (AP)
The ground is littered with pieces of ancient clay pots and other vessels at an archaeological dig in Istanbul, Turkey, Tuesday, June 20, 2006. Turkish archaeologists have discovered an ancient Byzantine port in an area that was planned to be an underground railway station, they announced on Tuesday. They´re calling the find the "Port of Theodosius," after the emperor of Rome and Byzantium who died in the year 395 AD, and say the finds here could shed significant light on the commercial life of this ancient city. (AP Photo/Osman Orsal)


The ground is littered with pieces of ancient clay pots and other vessels at an archaeological dig in Istanbul, Turkey, Tuesday, June 20, 2006. Turkish archaeologists have discovered an ancient Byzantine port in an area that was planned to be an underground railway station, they announced on Tuesday. They´re calling the find the "Port of Theodosius," after the emperor of Rome and Byzantium who died in the year 395 AD, and say the finds here could shed significant light on the commercial life of this ancient city. (AP Photo/Osman Orsal)

(AP) -- It seems a typical scene of urban decay: abandoned buildings, crumbling walls, trash and broken wine bottles. Yet it's more than 1,500 years old. Engineers uncovered these ruins of an ancient Byzantine port during drilling for a huge underground rail tunnel.



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"1,500-year-old Byzantine port discovered." July 23rd, 2006. http://phys.org/news72886506.html