Yurok Tribe to release condors in California

April 25th, 2014 by Jeff Barnard in Biology / Ecology
This July 21, 2012, file photo, provided by the Ventana Wildlife Society shows a condor in flight in Big Sur, Calif. The Yurok Tribe has signed agreements leading to the first release of captive-bred condors into the northern half of their historic range _ the sparsely populated Redwood Coast of Northern California. The tribe based at the mouth of the Klamath River has been working the past five years under a federal grant to establish whether the rare birds can survive in a place they have not lived for a century. (AP Photo/Ventana Wildlife Society, Tim Huntington, File)


This July 21, 2012, file photo, provided by the Ventana Wildlife Society shows a condor in flight in Big Sur, Calif. The Yurok Tribe has signed agreements leading to the first release of captive-bred condors into the northern half of their historic range _ the sparsely populated Redwood Coast of Northern California. The tribe based at the mouth of the Klamath River has been working the past five years under a federal grant to establish whether the rare birds can survive in a place they have not lived for a century. (AP Photo/Ventana Wildlife Society, Tim Huntington, File)

The Yurok Tribe has signed agreements with state and federal agencies that will lead to the first release of captive-bred condors into Northern California's Redwood Coast.

The far northern California-based tribe has been working the past five years to establish whether the endangered birds can survive in a place they have not lived for more than a century.

Last month, tribal officials signed a memorandum of understanding with state and federal agencies and a condor conservation group allowing for test releases as a final assessment of whether the region can support the .

Tribal biologist Chris West says they hope to do the first test releases in the next one to three years.

In this Aug. 5, 2009, file photo, curator Pam Service stands next to a stuffed condor, one of the last condors to fly over California's North Coast, at the Clarke Historical Museum in Eureka, Calif. The Yurok Tribe has signed agreements leading to the first release of captive-bred condors into the northern half of their historic range _ the sparsely populated Redwood Coast of Northern California. The tribe, based at the mouth of the Klamath River, has been working the past five years under a federal grant to establish whether the rare birds can survive in a place they have not lived for a century. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard, File)

In this Aug. 7, 2009, file photo, Yurok Tribe wildlife biotechnician Tiana Williams holds a turkey vulture in the hills above Orick, Calif., where it was trapped as part of the tribe's efforts to determine if the Klamath River canyon would be suitable habitat for condors. The Yurok Tribe has signed agreements leading to the first release of captive-bred condors into the northern half of their historic range _ the sparsely populated Redwood Coast of Northern California. The tribe, based at the mouth of the Klamath River, has been working the past five years under a federal grant to establish whether the rare birds can survive in a place they have not lived for a century. (AP Photo/Jeff Barnard, File)

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"Yurok Tribe to release condors in California." April 25th, 2014. http://phys.org/news/2014-04-yurok-tribe-condors-california.html