NASA image: Silver Fire, New Mexico

July 1st, 2013 in Earth / Earth Sciences
The Silver Fire in southern New Mexico continues to generate a lot of smoke, as seen recently on imagery from NASA's Terra satellite. Credit: Jeff Schmaltz, NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team; Caption: Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center


The Silver Fire in southern New Mexico continues to generate a lot of smoke, as seen recently on imagery from NASA's Terra satellite. Credit: Jeff Schmaltz, NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team; Caption: Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

The Silver Fire in southern New Mexico continues to generate a lot of smoke, as seen recently on imagery from NASA's Terra satellite.

The Silver Fire is burning in the Gila National Forest. As of July 1, the fire had consumed 133,625 acres. It began on June 7 from a near Kingston, New Mexico. According to the multi-agency Incident Information System called Inciweb, the fire was 50 percent contained on July 1.

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite has infrared capabilities that can detect heat from the various wildfires. This image was captured on June 28, 2013 18:05 UTC (2:05 p.m. EDT/12:05 p.m. MT). In the MODIS image, the fire or hot spot appears red and smoke appears in light brown. The smoke appears to have mixed with cumulus clouds straddling the New Mexico/Arizona border. The image was generated at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

Provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

"NASA image: Silver Fire, New Mexico." July 1st, 2013. http://phys.org/news/2013-07-nasa-image-silver-mexico.html