Society of Automotive Engineers adopts J1772 combo plug as standard for electric vehicles

October 19th, 2012 by Bob Yirka in Technology / Energy & Green Tech
SAE J1772 plug. Credit: Michael Hicks/Wikipedia


SAE J1772 plug. Credit: Michael Hicks/Wikipedia

(Phys.org)—The Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has voted to adopt the J1772 Revision B combo plug as the standard plug for use in electric and hybrid vehicles sold worldwide. The design allows for both AC and DC charging and its adoption means all car manufacturers except Tesla and several Japanese companies including Nissan and Mitsubishi, will begin using the new standard on all new vehicles.

The acceptance of the new standard will be a first for North America and could provide the push needed for commercial and public groups to begin building charging stations. The standard allows for charging at home using either a 120 or 224 AC line – the first is what is normally found in home wall outlets; the second for dryers or ovens. But it will also allow for DC charging which is where the industry is headed as it allows for far faster charging times – minutes versus hours for AC. It's the DC option that provides the basis for creating quick charging stations and perhaps the long anticipated widespread of .

The Japanese holdouts will continue to use the CHAdeMO standard, which is already widely supported in Japan and is based on quick charging using DC current. Tesla has created two of its own standards for each of its two models of vehicles and hasn't yet responded to the news of the adoption of the new standard. Nissan on the other hand has released a statement expressing disappoint with the decision made by the group and with it an implied critique regarding the timing of the adoption, coming after so many vehicles on the road are already configured for using the CHAdeMO standard.

For consumers the adoption will mean they will continue to be able to charge their vehicle at home, though they may have to purchase a as well depending on which vehicle they buy. It will likely also mean future charging stations they visit will offer several plug options, meaning drivers will have to know which standard their car has so they will know which to use.

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"Society of Automotive Engineers adopts J1772 combo plug as standard for electric vehicles." October 19th, 2012. http://phys.org/news/2012-10-society-automotive-j1772-combo-standard.html