Satellite imagery hints that Tropical Depression 7 may be reborn

August 17th, 2012 in Earth / Earth Sciences
On Aug. 17, 2012, NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured visible images of Tropical Depression 7's remnants at 9:45 am EDT. Showers and thunderstorm activity has increased over the Bay of Campeche. Credit: Credit: NASA GOES Project


On Aug. 17, 2012, NOAA's GOES-13 satellite captured visible images of Tropical Depression 7's remnants at 9:45 am EDT. Showers and thunderstorm activity has increased over the Bay of Campeche. Credit: Credit: NASA GOES Project

Satellite imagery on August 17 is showing signs of re-organization in the remnants of Tropical Depression 7 (TD7). TD7 has moved into the warm waters of the Bay of Campeche where it is regaining strength and appears much more organized.

NASA's GOES Project created a visible image of the remnants of 7 from August 17 at 9:45 a.m. EDT (1345 UTC) from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite. The image showed several areas of stronger thunderstorms. The stronger thunderstorms appear brighter white in the imagery and are located around the center and to the northeast of the center of circulation. NASA's GOES Project is located at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md.

The Bay of Campeche is located on the western side of Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula, and is part of the southwestern Gulf of Mexico. The Bay is surrounded on three sides by the Mexican states of Campeche, Veracruz and Tabasco.

Shower and thunderstorm activity picked up during the morning hours (Eastern Daylight Time) on August 17 in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico and Bay of Campeche. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted "surface observations and indicate that the circulation has also become a little better defined and environmental conditions appear conducive for development."

The remnants of TD7 are moving to the west-northwestward to northwestward at around 10 mph.

The NHC stated that a tropical depression could re-form before the low pressure area makes another landfall in Mexico over the weekend. So the remnants have a 70 percent chance of becoming a tropical depression again. A tropical storm watch or warning could be needed for part of the Gulf coast of Mexico.

Provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

"Satellite imagery hints that Tropical Depression 7 may be reborn." August 17th, 2012. http://phys.org/news/2012-08-satellite-imagery-hints-tropical-depression.html