Epson's 3-D glasses simulate 80-inch screen

April 1st, 2012 by Nancy Owano in Technology / Consumer & Gadgets

(PhysOrg.com) -- Epson America is now shipping Android-powered projector glasses that place your favorite videos, or games, literally in your face, Epson’s Moverio BT-100 wearable display glasses can simulate an 80-inch screen and deliver 3-D viewing. The Moverio BT-100 wearable display launched in Japan last November and is now available in the U.S. The device is on sale through Epson, resellers, or via Amazon.

At tech events, wearable displays that have showcased in the form of high-tech visors and chunky spectacles or goggles seem to draw measured responses—impressive inventions for private media viewing at home or on the go but silly-looking or even evocative of special-recovery shades for postoperative elderly outpatients. We noticed at least one reference to “grandma glasses.”

Epson’s Moverio BT-100 Wearable Display do not look exactly like designer sunglasses but they do have loaded features for gadget collectors who do not think $699.99 is an unthinkable price.

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According to reports, the glasses have pico projectors that are able to create a virtual experience of up to 80 inches’ display at a perceived distance of about 16 feet. According to Expert Reviews, the headset has a tiny pico built into each arm, pointing inwards towards an angled mirror in each lens, which projects the image in the center of the wearer’s vision. The dark outer visor is semi-transparent, letting the wearer see surroundings without being distracted by them.

The device carries 1GB of built-in storage. Users access downloaded content via the microSDHC card slot (4GB card included) There is built-in WFi connectivity; a lithium rechargeable battery provides around six hours of continuous use. Built-in earbuds provide Dolby Mobile virtual surround sound.

Of all the features, much appears to be made of the Android name in Epson product descriptions, as “Android-powered Moverio glasses.” The glasses connect to a control module; this Android 2.2-based handheld device lets the user select the content to view. Moverio is running on an Android 2.2 platform with Adobe Flash support. Epson publishes the kernel and an SDK, but the company is requiring developers to submit apps to them for consideration rather than going through an app store. The good news is that Epson is interested in seeing more new Android-based applications and side-by-side 3D content for its Moverio BT-100. To help support application and content development for Moverio BT-100, Epson is offering programs for developers residing in the United States.

Meanwhile, Epson’s end-user vision is to see the product adopted not merely for personal entertainment use but also for business and professional ends. America’s Anna Jen, director of New Business Development, said the Moverio BT-100 may play a role in virtual training platforms, 3D-CAD environments, and visualizing 3-D design renderings.

More information: www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/jsp/Moverio/Home.do

© 2012 PhysOrg.com

"Epson's 3-D glasses simulate 80-inch screen." April 1st, 2012. http://phys.org/news/2012-04-epson-d-glasses-simulate-inch.html