LulzSec computer hackers release Arizona state files

June 24th, 2011 in Technology / Internet

Computer hackers who have hit the websites of the CIA, US Senate, Sony and others have released hundreds of documents from the Arizona Department of Public Safety (AZDPS) in their latest cyberattack.

The known as Lulz Security, which has claimed credit for a series of data thefts in recent weeks, provided a link to the more than 700 documents on their website, LulzSecurity.com.

Lulz Security, or LulzSec, said they were releasing the documents to protest Arizona's immigration laws.

"We are releasing hundreds of private intelligence bulletins, training manuals, personal email correspondence, names, phone numbers, addresses and passwords belonging to Arizona law enforcement," the group said in a statement.

"We are targeting AZDPS specifically because we are against SB1070 (the Arizona immigration law) and the racial profiling anti-immigrant police state that is Arizona," it said.

The documents include information on drug cartels, street gangs, informants, border patrol operations and the names and addresses of members of the Arizona Highway Patrol.

The AZDPS website, azdps.gov, was not responding on Friday.

"Every week we plan on releasing more classified and embarrassing personal details of military and law enforcement in an effort not just to reveal their racist and corrupt nature but to purposefully sabotage their efforts to terrorize communities fighting an unjust 'war on drugs,'" Lulz Security said.

A British teenager suspected of involvement with the Lulz Security hacking spree has been remanded in police custody in London.

Ryan Cleary, 19, was arrested on Monday at his home in Wickford, southeast England, as part of a probe by Scotland Yard and the US (FBI) into Lulz Security.

British police on Wednesday charged Cleary with targeting the website of Britain's Serious Organised Crime Agency -- the British equivalent of the FBI -- with a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack.

DDoS attacks overwhelm websites with requests, causing them to be slow or inaccessible.

Lulz has staged a number of DDoS attacks on websites, including that of the CIA, but the group has also carried out a number of largescale data thefts.

(c) 2011 AFP

"LulzSec computer hackers release Arizona state files." June 24th, 2011. http://phys.org/news/2011-06-lulzsec-hackers-arizona-state.html