Terrorist de-radicalization shows promise, comprehensive study finds

July 3rd, 2010 in Other Sciences / Social Sciences

Prison-based programs to de-radicalize terrorists show promise, if well-run, says a new joint report from U.S. and British researchers. Their initial findings - the most comprehensive to date, based on programs in 15 nations - were presented at a conference this week.

Prisons and : Radicalization and De-radicalization in Countries is a joint report of the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START), based at the University of Maryland, and the International Center for the Study of Radicalization (ICSR), based at Kings College in London.

The report concludes that individual de-radicalization and disengagement programs, such as those in Saudi-Arabia, Singapore, Indonesia and other nations, "can make a difference." The researchers say their work could have policy implications for prisoners detained at Guantanamo Bay, Afghanistan and Iraq.

"This is a much bigger issue than most people appreciate," said University of Maryland professor Gary LaFree, director of the National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START). "It's a classic problem really. Prisons change behavior for both good and for bad. It's difficult to detain prisoners forever, but when is it safe to let them go?"

The final report will be presented in Washington, D.C. this fall.

"Initial results indicate that the programs can work, though probably not 100 percent of the time," LaFree adds. "Just as with regular criminals, individual and community supports help combat recidivism. But with terrorism and ideology there's an added dimension. In general, it's easier to de-radicalize when a movement is on the decline, when the battle seems lost."

KEY FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

The report identifies principles and best practices to help governments and policymakers avoid costly and counterproductive mistakes. These include:

More information: A copy of the preliminary report is available online.

Provided by University of Maryland

"Terrorist de-radicalization shows promise, comprehensive study finds." July 3rd, 2010. http://phys.org/news197350331.html