Agatha drenches Guatemala and El Salvador, remnants now in Caribbean

June 1st, 2010 in Earth / Earth Sciences
NASA's Aqua satellite AIRS instrument captured Tropical Depression Agatha on May 31 at 3:29 a.m. EDT (7:29 UTC). Agatha appears as the stretched out blue areas over Central America. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen


NASA's Aqua satellite AIRS instrument captured Tropical Depression Agatha on May 31 at 3:29 a.m. EDT (7:29 UTC). Agatha appears as the stretched out blue areas over Central America. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

Tropical Storm Agatha was the first tropical storm of the Eastern Pacific hurricane season, and took an inland route, drenching El Salvador and Guatemala this past weekend.

By Tuesday, June 1, Agatha's remnants had moved into the northwestern Caribbean Sea east of the Yucatan peninsula. Environmental conditions in the area, however, likely won't permit Agatha to reform into a tropical cyclone.

Over the weekend, by Sunday, May 30, Tropical Storm Agatha had already moved inland and its heavy rains left more than 100 people dead in Guatemala and El Salvador. Those rains caused flash floods and mudslides. After Agatha made landfall, the had been downgraded to a .

The government in El Salvador declared a state of emergency. In Guatemala, flash floods and mudslides created by Agatha's rains forced more than 70,000 people from their homes.

On Monday, May 31, Agatha's decreased to 30 miles (46 kilometers) per hour as her remnants crossed Guatemala's western highlands and were headed into the Gulf of Mexico.

NASA's Aqua satellite flew over Tropical Depression Agatha and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument onboard captured an on May 31 at 3:29 a.m. EDT (7:29 UTC). Agatha appeared as stretched out over Central America from the Eastern Pacific Ocean east into the Gulf of Mexico.

By June 1, Agatha's remnants had moved into the northwestern , and were located just east of the Yucatan peninsula. The remnants were still producing intermittent showers and thunderstorms. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) noted that "Upper-level winds...particularly to the north of the system in the are not conducive for development." As a result of the poor atmospheric conditions, the NHC only give Agatha a meager ten percent chance of becoming tropical once again.

Provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

"Agatha drenches Guatemala and El Salvador, remnants now in Caribbean." June 1st, 2010. http://phys.org/news194633037.html