Fridges talk to washing machines at high-tech fair

March 3rd, 2010 in Technology / Hi Tech & Innovation
A woman walks past an advertising poster at the world's biggest high-tech fair, the CeBIT in the northern German city of Hanover. A fridge that talks to your washing machine and a television that instructs your dishwasher. It's all possible at CeBIT, the world's top high-tech fair.


A woman walks past an advertising poster at the world's biggest high-tech fair, the CeBIT in the northern German city of Hanover. A fridge that talks to your washing machine and a television that instructs your dishwasher. It's all possible at CeBIT, the world's top high-tech fair.

A fridge that talks to your washing machine and a television that instructs your dishwasher. It's all possible at CeBIT, the world's top high-tech fair.

But the question is: what's the point?

"Well, for example, you could be sitting on your sofa in your living room and you want to turn on your washing machine," said Christian Prause, a developer of the yet-to-be finalised "Hydra" software.

"If your is equipped with our technology, you can send a message to the washing machine to turn itself on."

"And if for whatever reason it doesn't work, you can ask your fridge to transmit the order to the ," he added.

Prause said vacationers too need not panic if they realise they leave home in haste.

"Imagine you are 200 kilometres (130 miles) away, on holiday, and you realised you have forgotten to close your curtains."

Not to worry. You can send a quick text message to your curtain . If that doesn't work, you can always get your or your radio to lend a hand.

The fruit of four years of research by 10 different partners, including the German Fraunhofer Institute, the Hydra project is financially supported by the European Union.

Hydra "saves you time, energy and hassle," Prause insisted. With a bit of luck, "such a system could perhaps eventually appear in the shops."

(c) 2010 AFP

"Fridges talk to washing machines at high-tech fair." March 3rd, 2010. http://phys.org/news186844412.html