Rapid response science missions assess potential for another major Haiti earthquake

February 23rd, 2010 in Earth / Earth Sciences

To help assess the potential threat of more large earthquakes in Haiti and nearby areas, scientists at The University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics are co-leading three expeditions to the country with colleagues from Purdue University, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, the U.S. Geological Survey and five other institutions.

Rapid response missions can be critical for assessing future risks because a fault can continue to displace the ground for weeks and months after a large . At the same time, natural weathering processes and human activities can erase valuable geologic evidence.

The goal of the Haiti missions, researchers say, is to understand which segments of the earthquake fault ruptured during the Jan. 12 quake and how much fault movement and uplift of coastal features occurred in locations along or near the fault.

The Jackson School places a special emphasis on mounting rapid response missions to the scenes of geo-hazards, supporting previous missions after the earthquake and tsunami in the Solomon Islands (2007) and Hurricane Ike along the Texas Gulf Coast (2008). Few academic organizations have the infrastructure, equipment and expertise to mount a large field expedition on a few weeks' notice, yet they can yield valuable insights to prepare communities for future hazards.

"We expect a whole raft of studies about the Haiti earthquake coming out based on remote sensing data from satellites and airplanes," said Sean Gulick of the Institute for Geophysics. "But there's no substitute for getting on the ground and in the water to look directly at its immediate effects."

While collecting information that can save lives in the near future is a top priority of the expeditions, the scientists are also working to help cultivate local earthquake expertise. Two Haitian scientists have been invited to participate-Nicole Dieudonne, a representative of the Haitian Bureau of Mines and Energy, and Steeven Smyithe, a student from the State University of Haiti.

"We're trying to engage the Haitian science community," said Mann, who will return to Haiti for the second expedition. "They can help us communicate better with Haitian policy makers and people about the geology behind this devastating earthquake and about the risks going forward."

In 2008, Mann, Calais and colleagues presented a paper at the Caribbean Conference forecasting a 7.2 magnitude earthquake in the area of Haiti, Jamaica and the Dominican Republic. The forecast was based on an integration of geologic information on the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden fault zone with GPS data collected in the region. David Manaker, Calais and colleagues published an article on the same topic in Geophysical Journal International.

Provided by University of Texas at Austin

"Rapid response science missions assess potential for another major Haiti earthquake." February 23rd, 2010. http://phys.org/news186169536.html