NASA's Aqua Satellite sees Tropical Depression Fami fading fast

February 3rd, 2010 in Earth / Earth Sciences
NASA's Aqua satellite AIRS instrument captured Fami (blue) on Feb. 3 at 09:35 UTC (4:35 a.m. ET), and showed the system more resembling a cold front than a tropical cyclone, as it appears stretched out from northwest to southeast. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen


NASA's Aqua satellite AIRS instrument captured Fami (blue) on Feb. 3 at 09:35 UTC (4:35 a.m. ET), and showed the system more resembling a cold front than a tropical cyclone, as it appears stretched out from northwest to southeast. Credit: NASA JPL, Ed Olsen

Now that Fami has crossed Madagascar, its fading fast. NASA's Aqua satellite captured an infrared satellite image earlier today that showed the storm was elongating and losing its circulation.

NASA's AIRS instrument captured Fami on Feb. 3 at 09:35 UTC (4:35 a.m. ET), and showed the system more resembling a cold front than a tropical cyclone, as it appears stretched out from northwest to southeast. There are also very few strong thunderstorms left in what was once the center.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their last advisory on the system at 1 p.m. ET on February 2 after it crossed Madagascar, and entered the Southern Indian Ocean. At that time it was located approximately 150 nautical miles southwest of Antananarivo, Madagascar, near 21.0 South and 45.5 East. It had maximum sustained wind near 34 mph, but was rapidly fading. Fami tracked eastward at 11 mph (10 knots) into open waters.

Animated showed a significant decrease and disorganization of deep after Fami tracked over Madagascar, as a result of friction from sweeping over mountainous areas.

Fami could dissipate by Thursday, February 4. However, there is a slight chance that Fami could briefly regain some life and transition into an extra-tropical storm. Forecasters will be watching it closely.

Provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

"NASA's Aqua Satellite sees Tropical Depression Fami fading fast." February 3rd, 2010. http://phys.org/news184440427.html