Prometheus: Over Easy

January 29th, 2010 in Astronomy & Space / Space Exploration
Prometheus displayed its pockmarked, irregular surface for NASA's Cassini spacecraft on Jan. 27, 2010. Image credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute


Prometheus displayed its pockmarked, irregular surface for NASA's Cassini spacecraft on Jan. 27, 2010. Image credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

(PhysOrg.com) -- Looking for all intents and purposes like a celestial egg after a session in Saturn's skillet, Prometheus displayed its pockmarked, irregular surface for NASA's Cassini spacecraft on Jan. 27, 2010.

Prometheus is one of Saturn's innermost moons. It orbits the gas-giant at a distance of 139,353 kilometers (85,590 miles) and is 86 kilometers (53 miles) across at its widest point.

The porous, icy-bodied world was originally discovered by images taken by Voyager 1 back in 1980. You could say this latest "egg-cellent" view has the Cassini science team licking their chops at the thought of future Prometheus images.

This raw, unprocessed image of Prometheus [pro-MEE-thee-us] , taken in , was obtained by Cassini's narrow-angle camera at a distance of approximately 36,000 kilometers (23,000 miles).

Provided by JPL/NASA

"Prometheus: Over Easy ." January 29th, 2010. http://phys.org/news183994478.html