Study finds gender gap persists in cardiac care

December 9th, 2009 in Medicine & Health / Health

Gender differences persist in the quality of cardiac care across Ontario, according to a health study by researchers at St. Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES). Ontario women who had heart attacks were less likely to receive care from a cardiologist, be referred for angiography, or be prescribed statins, cholesterol-lowering drugs.

Readmission to hospital after having a was also studied over a 30-day and one-year timeframe, and over both periods women who had a heart attack were more likely to be readmitted to the hospital than men.

However, the study also found women and men who had heart attacks had similar rates of use of other important medicines recommended after a heart attack, excluding statins, and experienced the same wait time for procedures like angiographies.

"The good news is the has narrowed over the past decade and we identified a number of areas where care received by women and men is comparable," says Dr. Arlene Bierman, a physician at St. Michael's Hospital and principal investigator of the study, entitled Project for an Ontario Women's Evidence-Based Report (POWER). "Now we need to eliminate the gender disparities that remain to improve health outcomes and provide a better quality of life for women with heart disease."

Key findings of the POWER Study Cardiovascular chapter released today include:

"The findings clearly support the need to improve cardiovascular care for women," says Pat Campbell, CEO, Echo: Improving Women's Health in Ontario. "Significant variations in across the province are also of great concern and must be addressed to ensure equitable and quality cardiovascular care for all. The POWER study is helping to identify key areas for healthcare reform and for the first time provides a starting point to measure improvements."

"Many of these results are of concern, yet were foreshadowed in the Heart and Stroke Foundation's 2007 Report on the Health of Canadians' "Time to Bridge the Gender Gap", says Dr. Marco Di Buono, Director of Research, Heart & Stroke Foundation of Ontario. "If we do not address disparities in women's heart health, we will see mortality rates from this disease increase in Canadian women sooner than we expect."

The joint study from St. Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) is the first in Ontario to provide a comprehensive overview of women's health in relation to gender, income, education, ethnicity and geography. The Cardiovascular Disease report released today also examines care for heart failure and stroke, and the health and functional status among women and men with cardiovascular disease. POWER reports on indicators of population health and of how well the health system is performing. Policymakers and health-care providers may use these research findings to improve access, quality and outcomes of care for Ontario . The POWER Study was funded by Echo: Improving Women's Health in Ontario, an agency of the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care.

Source: St. Michael's Hospital

"Study finds gender gap persists in cardiac care." December 9th, 2009. http://phys.org/news179582219.html