Scientists look to cut cow flatulence

March 21st, 2008 in Earth / Environment

Scientists in Scotland said they've found a way to cut greenhouse gas emissions by curbing cow and sheep flatulence.

The Rowett Research Institute in Aberdeen said 60 percent of global methane formation is due to agricultural activities, with just under half of that produced by ruminants such as cows and sheep, the Scottish government said Wednesday in a release.

Researchers said the average cow contributes as much to global warming as a family car that travels 12,000 miles, The Daily Telegraph reported.

The scientists found that adding fumaric acid to animal feed can inhibit the production of methane that occurs naturally as part of the animal's digestive process. Tests of the feed additive on lambs showed methane production can be cut by up to 70 percent. The feed also resulted in lambs gaining weight faster.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

"Scientists look to cut cow flatulence." March 21st, 2008. http://phys.org/news125318981.html