Physics - Condensed Matter news

Water can flow below -130 C

When water is cooled below zero degrees, it usually crystallizes directly into ice. Ove Andersson, a physicist at Umea University, has now managed to produce sluggishly flowing water at 130 degree below zero ...

dateJun 28, 2011 in Condensed Matter
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Consider the 'anticrystal'

(Phys.org) —For the last century, the concept of crystals has been a mainstay of solid-state physics. Crystals are paragons of order; crystalline materials are defined by the repeating patterns their constituent ...

dateJul 07, 2014 in Condensed Matter
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For better batteries, just add water

Lithium-ion batteries are now found everywhere in devices such as cellular phones and laptop computers, where they perform well. In automotive applications, however, engineers face the challenge of squeezing ...

dateJul 04, 2013 in Condensed Matter
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Amplifier helps diamond spy on atoms

(PhysOrg.com) -- An ‘amplifier’ molecule placed on the tip of a diamond could help scientists locate and identify individual atoms, Oxford University and Singapore scientists believe.

dateNov 12, 2011 in Condensed Matter
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On the path to metallic hydrogen

Hydrogen, the most common element in the universe, is normally an insulating gas, but at high pressures it may turn into a superconductor. Now, scientists at the Carnegie Institution in Washington D.C., US, ...

dateAug 03, 2009 in Condensed Matter
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Intelligent steel for safer cars

Each year, more than 200,000 car accidents occur in Germany. Car manufacturers devote much time, effort, and cost to developing new ways of protecting drivers and passengers.

dateSep 18, 2007 in Condensed Matter
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On the edge of friction

(PhysOrg.com) -- The problem exists on both a large and a small scale, and it even bothered the ancient Egyptians. However, although physicists have long had a good understanding of friction in things like ...

dateDec 20, 2011 in Condensed Matter
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