University of Innsbruck

University of Innsbruck (German: Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck) has been a university in Austria since 1669. It is currently the largest education facility in the Austrian Bundesland of Tirol, the third largest in Austria behind Vienna University and the University of Graz and according to latest ratings Austria's leading university. Significant contributions have been made in many branches, most of all in the physics department. In 1562, a Jesuit grammar school was established in Innsbruck, today the "Akademisches Gymnasium Innsbruck". It was financed by the salt mines in Hall in Tirol and was founded as a university in 1669 by Leopold I with four faculties. In 1782 this was reduced to a mere lyceum (as were all other Universities in Austrian Empire, apart from Prague, Vienna and Lviv), but it was re-established as the University of Innsbruck in 1826 by Emperor Franz I. The university is therefore named after both of its founding fathers with the official title of: "Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck" (Universitas Leopoldino-Franciscea).

Address
Innrain 52, Innsbruck, Austria, Austria
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Quantum chaos in ultracold gas discovered

A team of University of Innsbruck researchers discovered that even simple systems, such as neutral atoms, can possess chaotic behavior, which can be revealed using the tools of quantum mechanics. The ground-breaking ...

Mar 12, 2014 5 / 5 (24) 0

An infallible quantum measurement

Entanglement is a key resource for upcoming quantum computers and simulators. Now, physicists in Innsbruck and Geneva realized a new, reliable method to verify entanglement in the laboratory using a minimal ...

Aug 05, 2013 4.9 / 5 (32) 4 | with audio podcast

Competition in the quantum world

Innsbruck physicists led by Rainer Blatt and Peter Zoller experimentally gained a deep insight into the nature of quantum mechanical phase transitions. They are the first scientists that simulated the competition ...

May 20, 2013 4.1 / 5 (23) 5 | with audio podcast

Powering lasers through heat

In micro electronics heat often causes problems and engineers have to put a lot of technical effort into cooling, for example micro chips, to dissipate heat that is generated during operation. Austrian physicists ...

Nov 13, 2012 5 / 5 (6) 2 | with audio podcast