University of Cambridge

Microscopic rowing—without a cox

Many different types of cell, including sperm, bacteria and algae, propel themselves using whip-like appendages known as flagella. These protrusions, about one-hundredth of a millimetre long, function like ...

dateJul 29, 2014 in Cell & Microbiology
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Building 'invisible' materials with light

A new method of building materials using light, developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge, could one day enable technologies that are often considered the realm of science fiction, such as invisibility ...

dateJul 28, 2014 in Nanomaterials
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Study reveals economic impact of El Nino

(Phys.org) —El Niño has a significant impact on the world and local economies - and not always for the worst - and countries should plan ahead to mitigate its effects, according to a new Working Paper ...

dateJul 14, 2014 in Earth Sciences
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Gum arabic under an electron microscope (w/ Video)

This alien glob in the video below is a piece of gum arabic from the hardened sap of the Acacia tree, most likely collected from a tree in Sudan. Rox Middleton explains how the electron microscope has changed the way we are ...

dateJul 01, 2014 in Nanophysics
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Forest of carbon nanotubes (w/ Video)

This image shows a 'forest' of carbon nanotubes – thousands upon thousands of tiny rolls of carbon atoms, grown on a scrap of copper foil. James Dolan explains how easy it is to run across beautiful scenery such as this ...

dateJun 27, 2014 in Nanomaterials
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Seeds to skyscrapers

Wood is one of the oldest building materials but its use is limited by its properties. With new funding, researchers aim to stretch these properties to an unprecedented degree, creating the means to build ...

dateJun 25, 2014 in Engineering
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