University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa

The University of Alabama (UA) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, United States. Founded in 1831, it is the flagship university of the University of Alabama System, as well the senior and the largest in terms of enrollment among all of the state's universities. It is known as The Capstone, a nickname that stems from a 1913 speech by then-president George H. Denny, who extolled the university as the "capstone of the public school system in the state." UA offers programs of study in 13 academic divisions leading to bachelor's, master's, Education Specialist, and doctoral degrees. The only publicly supported law school in Alabama is at UA. Other academic programs unavailable elsewhere in Alabama include doctoral programs in anthropology, library and information studies, metallurgical engineering, music, Romance languages, and social work. As one of the first public universities established in early 19th century southwestern frontier of the US, UA left a vast cultural imprint on the state, region and nation as a whole for the past two centuries. The school was a center of activity during the American Civil War and the Civil Rights movement.

Address
739 University Blvd, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, United States of America 35487
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Taking the pulse of a supermassive black hole

(Phys.org) —Rare heartbeat-like pulsations detected from a supermassive black hole may grant scientists better insight into these exotic objects, according to two University of Alabama astronomers who co-authored ...

Dec 05, 2013
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Improving energy conversion processes

(Phys.org) —Renewable energy sources such as wind-powered generators can be more reliable and efficient by better controlling the process of getting electricity onto the power grid, according to a United ...

Dec 03, 2013
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Researchers look to butterflies to improve flight

A better understanding of the aerodynamic properties of butterfly wings may lead to improved human-made flight, according to research at The University of Alabama recently funded by the National Science Foundation.

Oct 24, 2013
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