University College London

Nanomagnets guide stem cells to damaged tissue

Microscopic magnetic particles have been used to bring stem cells to sites of cardiovascular injury in a new method designed to increase the capacity of cells to repair damaged tissue, UCL scientists announced today.

dateAug 17, 2009 in Bio & Medicine
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Spread your sperm the smart way

(PhysOrg.com) -- Attractive males release fewer sperm per mating to maximise their chances of producing offspring across a range of females, according to a new paper on the evolution of ejaculation strategies. The findings ...

dateJul 09, 2009 in Evolution
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Why you can't hurry love

(PhysOrg.com) -- Scientists have developed a mathematical model of the mating game to help explain why courtship is often protracted. The study, by researchers at UCL (University College London), University of Warwick and ...

dateJan 16, 2009 in
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Astronomers catch binary star explosion inside nebula

The explosion of a binary star inside a planetary nebula has been captured by a team led by UCL (University College London) researchers – an event that has not been witnessed for more than 100 years. The study, published ...

dateNov 19, 2008 in Astronomy
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Putting a new spin on current research

Physicists in the USA and at the London Centre for Nanotechnology have found a way to extend the quantum lifetime of electrons by more than 5,000 per cent, as reported in this week's Physical Review Letters. Electr ...

dateNov 15, 2008 in General Physics
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Brain's 'hate circuit' identified

People who view pictures of someone they hate display activity in distinct areas of the brain that, together, may be thought of as a 'hate circuit', according to new research by scientists at UCL (University College London).

dateOct 29, 2008 in Medical research
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The great cosmic challenge

(PhysOrg.com) -- Today cosmologists are challenging the world to solve a compelling statistical problem, to bring us closer to understanding the nature of dark matter and energy which makes up 95 per cent of the ‘missing’ ...

dateOct 28, 2008 in General Physics
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Are you phonagnosic?

The first known case of someone born without the ability to recognise voices has been reported in a paper by UCL (University College London) researchers, in a study of a rare condition known as phonagnosia. The UCL team are ...

dateOct 27, 2008 in Medical research
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