Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM)

Universiti Putra Malaysia (English: Putra University, Malaysia ), or UPM, is a leading research intensive public university located in central Peninsular Malaysia, close to the capital city, Kuala Lumpur. It was formerly known as Universiti Pertanian Malaysia or Agricultural University of Malaysia (Malay: universiti, university; pertanian, agriculture; Malaysia). UPM is a research university offering undergraduate and postgraduate courses with a research focus on agricultural sciences and its related fields. Ranked joint 358th best university in the world in 2011 by Quacquarelli Symonds, UPM is taking steps to boost its research capabilities both in and beyond the scope of agriculture. One can trace the origins of UPM to the School of Agriculture officially instituted on 21 May 1931 by John Scott, an administrative officer of the British colonial Straits Settlements. The School was located on a 22-acre (89,000 m) spread in Serdang, Selangor state. The School began by offering the three-year Diploma program and a one-year Certificate course. By 1941 the School had succeeded in training 321 officers, with 155 having obtained the Diploma and 166 the Certificate.

Seri Kembangan, Selangor, Malaysia
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Assessing the resource potential of Sal seeds in India

A common evergreen seed is capable of providing almost 150,000 person-days of employment during a single collection season in the Kumaun Himalayas region of northern India, according to a recent study in the Pertanika Journal ...

dateOct 27, 2015 in Ecology
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Turning sewage sludge into concrete

The disposal of sludge from sewage water treatment is a big issue for wastewater plants in Malaysia. While studies show that the volume of sludge is expected to rise, disposal options are limited due to stricter environmental ...

dateAug 27, 2015 in Engineering
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Purifying contaminated water with crab shells

Copper and cadmium exist naturally in the environment, but human activities including industrial and agricultural processes can increase their concentrations. At high concentrations, copper can cause unwanted health effects ...

dateAug 25, 2015 in Environment
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