The Research Council of Norway

The Research Council of Norway (Norwegian: Norges forskningsråd) is a Norwegian government agency responsible for awarding grands for research as well as promoting research and science. It also advises the Government in matters related to research, and is subordinate the Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research. The Research Council of Norway total budget in 2009 amounted to NOK 6 165 million. There were five predecessors of the council, each established as independent councils related to their own areas of interest: science and technology (1946), social sciences (1949), agriculture (1949), fisheries (1972) and applied social sciences (1987). The five were merged in 1993 to form the current council. The Research Council of Norway's main office is located at Stenberggata 26 in Oslo. The Research Council has appointed local representatives in nine different regions of Norway.

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Progressively wetter in Norway

Climate change will make life wetter for most Norwegians in the years to come. A rainier climate is expected nationwide, with the possible exception of southern Norway in the summers.

dateFeb 27, 2013 in Environment
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Climate change to lengthen growing season

Across much of Norway, the agricultural growing season could become up to two months longer due to climate change. A research project has been studying the potential and challenges inherent in such a scenario.

dateOct 10, 2012 in Environment
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Cold wind makes Norwegian Sea warmer

(Phys.org)—The Gulf Stream and the warm waters it brings are one reason the climate is milder along the Norwegian coastline than other places so far north. Researchers now know that the Gulf Stream is not only driven from ...

dateOct 11, 2012 in Earth Sciences
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New promise in sea lice-eating lumpfish

Ballan wrasse and goldsinny wrasse are currently the principal biological weapons to fight sea lice at fish farms in Trøndelag county and further south. As these two species are sensitive to cold temperatures, they would ...

dateAug 27, 2012 in Ecology
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Super first feed soon ready to serve

They can be stored for months and then hatch in seawater within 24 hours. Production of copepods, the ultimate live feed for Ballan wrasse and the fry of other marine fish species, can soon be industrialised.

dateAug 27, 2012 in Plants & Animals
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