The Research Council of Norway

The Research Council of Norway (Norwegian: Norges forskningsråd) is a Norwegian government agency responsible for awarding grands for research as well as promoting research and science. It also advises the Government in matters related to research, and is subordinate the Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research. The Research Council of Norway total budget in 2009 amounted to NOK 6 165 million. There were five predecessors of the council, each established as independent councils related to their own areas of interest: science and technology (1946), social sciences (1949), agriculture (1949), fisheries (1972) and applied social sciences (1987). The five were merged in 1993 to form the current council. The Research Council of Norway's main office is located at Stenberggata 26 in Oslo. The Research Council has appointed local representatives in nine different regions of Norway.

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Next-generation echo sounder ready

Norwegian researchers are putting the finishing touches on a new echo sounder that provides far more information than previous versions ever could – making it much easier to identify fish and zooplankton.

dateNov 08, 2012 in Ecology
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Genome provides new weapon against sea lice

An international team of researchers has now sequenced nearly the entire genetic material of the sea louse. On 1 March the Institute of Marine Research gave the world open access to this research source, which could enable ...

dateMay 29, 2012 in Biotechnology
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A slimy marine organism fit for biofuel and salmon feed

(Phys.org) —It sounds too good to be true: a common marine species that consumes microorganisms and can be converted into much-needed feed for salmon or a combustible biofuel for filling petrol tanks. And it can be cultivated ...

dateJun 27, 2013 in Ecology
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Global warming less extreme than feared?

Policymakers are attempting to contain global warming at less than 2°C. New estimates from a Norwegian project on climate calculations indicate this target may be more attainable than many experts have feared.

dateJan 25, 2013 in Environment
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Recirculation technology improves smolt welfare

New knowledge is making land-based smolt production more efficient and improving fish welfare in the process. Recirculation technology is solving the problem of access to an adequate supply of fresh water for additional fry ...

dateJun 07, 2013 in Ecology
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Learning platform uses quiz concept

Can university students, schoolchildren and employees play their way to knowledge? Can computerised games help to reverse worrisome school drop-out rates? Yes, say the researchers behind the Norwegian-developed Kahoot! learning ...

dateApr 26, 2013 in Social Sciences
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Fewer willing to participate in surveys

The percentage of respondents to many important research surveys is dropping sharply. Social science researchers are concerned that survey samples can be skewed, which can compromise the validity of results.

dateJun 07, 2013 in Social Sciences
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