Society for Experimental Biology

The taming of the rat

If you worry about having a pet rat in case it bites you, then you can relax. Recent research has found that a domesticated strain of rat selectively bred for tameness never bites human handlers.

dateJul 06, 2016 in Plants & Animals
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Smoking out blackgrass seeds

Blackgrass is a problem weed in UK agriculture, but a new technique may help farmers to combat its resistance to herbicides. Application of a smoke particle solution called 'smokewater' has been found to cause blackgrass ...

dateJul 06, 2016 in Ecology
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Doggy paddles help dogs to stay on the move

Canine hydrotherapy improves the mobility of Labradors suffering from elbow dysplasia. Not only this, it also positively affects the strides of healthy dogs, showing great potential as both a therapeutic tool and an effective ...

dateJul 06, 2016 in Plants & Animals
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Transforming water fleas prepare for battle

Water fleas can thwart their enemies by growing defensive structures such as helmets and spines. What's more, this predator-induced 'arming' process is not a one-size-fits-all approach - they can even tailor their defensive ...

dateJul 06, 2016 in Plants & Animals
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King penguins keep an ear out for predators

Sleeping king penguins react differently to the sounds of predators than to non-predators and other sounds, when they are sleeping on the beach. Research carried out at the University of Roehampton, UK, has revealed that ...

dateJul 06, 2016 in Plants & Animals
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Birds get the green (and red) light

Japanese quail grow and breed best under green and red lighting. An important bird in the poultry industry, quail thrive better under these conditions than in white and blue light, according to recent research carried out ...

dateJul 06, 2016 in Plants & Animals
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Acid attack—can mussels hang on for much longer?

Scientists from The University of Washington have found evidence that ocean acidification caused by carbon emissions can prevent mussels attaching themselves to rocks and other substrates, making them easy targets for predators ...

dateJul 05, 2016 in Ecology
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