SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) was originally called Stanford Linear Accelerator Center when it was established in 1962 on some land owned by Stanford University in California. SLAC is an arm of the Department of Energy and is managed and operated by Stanford University. SLAC has produced three Nobel Prize winners and focuses on experimental, theoretical research in elementary particle physics, atomic and solid-state physics, chemistry, biology, astrophysics and medicine. SLAC offers internships and fellowships for studies. SLAC publishes the latest in breaking physics, astrophysics and interdisciplinary research. Media inquiries are welcome and the news page is complete.

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Extreme plasma theories put to the test

The first controlled studies of extremely hot, dense matter have overthrown the widely accepted 50-year old model used to explain how ions influence each other's behavior in a dense plasma. The results should benefit a wide ...

dateAug 06, 2012 in Plasma Physics
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Exploring middle ground of solids and liquids

(Phys.org)—In experiments at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, researchers made snapshots of atomic-scale fluctuations in liquids and glasses. The results are a first step toward ...

dateNov 16, 2012 in Condensed Matter
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Water Motions Revealed (w/ Video)

(PhysOrg.com) -- Gaze into a glass of water, and you're unlikely to see much more than your own reflection. But gaze a little deeper using a microscope -- or, better yet, a series of laser pulses and detectors -- and you'll ...

dateMay 21, 2010 in Condensed Matter
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The decades-long search for the Higgs

(Phys.org) -- It was a little over two years ago that the Large Hadron Collider kicked off its search for the Higgs boson. But the hunt for the Higgs really began decades ago with the realization of a puzzle to be solved, ...

dateJul 05, 2012 in General Physics
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