SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) was originally called Stanford Linear Accelerator Center when it was established in 1962 on some land owned by Stanford University in California. SLAC is an arm of the Department of Energy and is managed and operated by Stanford University. SLAC has produced three Nobel Prize winners and focuses on experimental, theoretical research in elementary particle physics, atomic and solid-state physics, chemistry, biology, astrophysics and medicine. SLAC offers internships and fellowships for studies. SLAC publishes the latest in breaking physics, astrophysics and interdisciplinary research. Media inquiries are welcome and the news page is complete.

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Novel analysis method levels the quasar playing field

( —In the nearly six decades since quasars were discovered, the list of these energetic galaxies powered by supermassive black holes has grown to more than 100,000 – enough examples to reveal important information ...

dateApr 18, 2013 in Astronomy
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X-ray laser sees photosynthesis in action

Opening a new window on the way plants generate the oxygen we breathe, researchers used an X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to simultaneously look at the structure and chemical ...

dateFeb 14, 2013 in General Physics
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X-ray laser pulses in two colors

( —SLAC researchers have demonstrated for the first time how to produce pairs of X-ray laser pulses in slightly different wavelengths, or colors, with finely adjustable intervals between them – a feat that will ...

dateMar 27, 2013 in General Physics
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New X-ray tool proves timing is everything

(—With SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, timing is everything. Its pulses are designed to explore atomic-scale processes that are measured in femtoseconds, or quadrillionths of a second. Determining ...

dateFeb 20, 2013 in Optics & Photonics
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For superionic material, smaller is better

(—A material that could enable faster memory chips and more efficient batteries can switch between high and low ionic conductivity states much faster than previously thought, SLAC and Stanford researchers have ...

dateFeb 08, 2013 in Condensed Matter
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