Rockefeller University

Molecule stops DNA replication in its tracks

(PhysOrg.com) -- When a dividing cell duplicates its genetic material, a molecular machine called a sliding clamp travels along the DNA double helix, tethering the proteins that perform the replication. Researchers ...

dateOct 20, 2008 in
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Astrocytes and synaptic plasticity

By mopping up excess neurotrophic factor from neuronal synapses, astrocytes may finely tune synaptic transmission to affect processes such as learning and memory, say Bergami et al.

dateOct 13, 2008 in
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Newly identified cells make fat

To understand where fat comes from, you have to start with a skinny mouse. By using such a creature, and observing the growth of fat after injections of different kinds of immature cells, scientists at the ...

dateOct 04, 2008 in
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Stem cells stand up for themselves

Adult stem cells are not pampered pushovers. O'Reilly et al. report that certain stem cells take charge of their surroundings, molding their environment to control their division and differentiation.

dateAug 25, 2008 in
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A snooze button for the circadian clock

We may use the snooze button to fine-tune our sleep cycles, but our cells have a far more meticulous and refined system. Humans, and most other organisms, have 24-hour rhythms that are regulated by a precise molecular clock ...

dateAug 14, 2008 in
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Molecular bridge serves as a tether for a cell's nucleus

(PhysOrg.com) -- A cell's nucleus - home of it its most precious contents — is a delicate envelope that, without support, is barely able to withstand the forces that keep it in place. Now, researchers have ...

dateAug 08, 2008 in
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A positive-feedback system ensures that cells divide

(PhysOrg.com) -- In the life of every cell, there’s a point of no return. Once it enters the cell cycle and passes a checkpoint known as “Start,” a cell will follow the steps it needs to divide — no matter what changes ...

dateAug 07, 2008 in
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