RIKEN

Primates too can move in unison

Japanese researchers show for the first time that primates modify their body movements to be in tune with others, just like humans do. Humans unconsciously modify their movements to be in synchrony with their peers. For example, ...

dateJan 28, 2013 in Plants & Animals
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A better trigger for targeted drug delivery

Biomolecular 'nanocarriers' formed by the careful assembly of protein subunits are common in nature and perform a range of essential roles in biological processes, powered by the biological energy carrier adenosine-5'-triphosphate ...

dateAug 09, 2013 in Biochemistry
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Emerging from the vortex

Whether a car or a ball, the forces acting on a body moving in a straight line are very different to those acting on one moving in tight curves. This maxim also holds true at microscopic scales. As such, a beam of electrons ...

dateFeb 17, 2012 in General Physics
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The origin of organic magnets

Electrical engineers are starting to consider materials made from organic molecules -- including those made from carbon atoms -- as an intriguing alternative to the silicon and metals used currently in electronic devices, ...

dateMar 02, 2012 in Condensed Matter
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The long and short of sperm tails

A team of biologists in Japan has uncovered an unexpected role for mitochondria1, the power houses of cells, in the development of sperm in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

dateAug 05, 2011 in Plants & Animals
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A new role for cytokinin plant hormones

When plants, including crops, are exposed to environmental stresses such as drought or high salinity, abscisic acid (ABA), a stress-responsive hormone is synthesized to induce a protective response. At the same time, the ...

dateSep 09, 2011 in Biotechnology
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