RIKEN

Putting artificial atoms on the clock

Around the turn of the century, scientists began to understand that atoms have discrete energy levels. Within the field of quantum physics, this sparked the development of quantum optics in which light is ...

Nov 07, 2011
5 / 5 (1) 0

Shedding light on a photosensitive protein

Even without eyes, many single-celled organisms can perceive and react to light. This is achieved via rhodopsins, proteins at the cell surface that trigger responses to specific wavelengths of light by directing ...

Nov 04, 2011
not rated yet 2 | with audio podcast

Shaping up for cell division

The shape of chromosomes is determined by the relative levels of key protein complexes, research conducted by Keishi Shintomi and Tatsuya Hirano of the RIKEN Advanced Science Institute has shown.

Nov 04, 2011
4 / 5 (1) 0 | with audio podcast

On guard against drought

Identification of a gene that helps plants to conserve water under drought conditions will bring biologists closer to understanding how plants tolerate drought. Researchers, led by Takashi Kuromori at Japan's ...

Oct 28, 2011
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How cells know when to tighten the belt

The epithelial cells that line the surface of tissues form a tightly sealed barrier, with individual cells joined together by structures called apical junctional complexes (AJCs). However, embryonic epithelium ...

Oct 21, 2011
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Recognizing pathogenic invaders

Researchers in Japan have determined the structural basis of the molecular defense system that protects insects from pathogens1, which provides clarity on the molecular binding that underpins this defense ...

Oct 21, 2011
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Moving forward, spin goes sideways

Building electronic devices that work without needing to actually transport electrons is a goal of spintronics researchers, since this could lead to: reduced power consumption, lower levels of signal noise, faster ...

Oct 07, 2011
4 / 5 (3) 1

Imaging inflammation in the living brain

Inflammation occurs in the human brain during illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson’s disease, stroke and traumatic brain injury. Now, a research team in Japan has developed a probe that can ...

Sep 30, 2011
4.7 / 5 (3) 0

Antimatter sticks around

By successfully confining atoms of antihydrogen for an unprecedented 1,000 seconds, an international team of researchers called the ALPHA Collaboration has taken a step towards resolving one of the grand challenges ...

Sep 22, 2011
4.7 / 5 (22) 6 | with audio podcast

Rapid profiling of drug candidates

In the hunt for new medicines, any technique that expedites drug candidates into the clinic is a welcome advance. A team led by Hiroyuki Osada at the RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako, recently developed ...

Sep 22, 2011
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