Public Library of Science

The Public Library of Science (PLOS) was founded in 2000 by biomedical scientists Harold E. Varmus, Patrick O. Brown and Michael Eisen for the purpose of granting open access to the public about scientific research papers. An open letter was sent to scientific publishers encouraging them to all distribution of their research literature through an on-line publication like the National Library of Medicine's PubMed Central. In response to a less than receptive response, PLOS launched a nonprofit scientific and medical publishing venture in 2003. PLOS articles are available free on-line and appear immediately on the web site for no charge. PLOS received start-up funds from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundations and has received various other foundation endowments for their not for profit enterprise.

Address
185 Berry Street, Suite 3100 San Francisco, CA 94107 USA
E-mail
press@plos.org
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How the 'mute' cicada sings

"Mute" cicadas may use the sound of wing impact to communicate, according to a study published February 25, 2015 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Changqing Luo from Northwest A&F University, China, and colleagues.

dateFeb 25, 2015 in Plants & Animals
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How dinosaur arms turned into bird wings

Although we now appreciate that birds evolved from a branch of the dinosaur family tree, a crucial adaptation for flight has continued to puzzle evolutionary biologists. During the millions of years that elapsed, wrists went ...

dateSep 30, 2014 in Archaeology & Fossils
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How female fruit flies know when to say 'yes'

A fundamental question in neurobiology is how animals, including humans, make decisions. A new study publishing in the open access journal PLOS Biology on October 7 reveals how fruit fly females make a very important decision: ...

dateOct 07, 2014 in Plants & Animals
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Ancient rhino-relatives were water-loving

The discovery of new bones from a large land mammal that lived about 48 million years ago has led scientists to identify a new branch of mammals closely related to modern horses, rhinos, and tapirs, according to a study published ...

dateOct 08, 2014 in Archaeology & Fossils
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Meteorite that doomed dinosaurs remade forests

The meteorite impact that spelled doom for the dinosaurs 66 million years ago decimated the evergreens among the flowering plants to a much greater extent than their deciduous peers, according to a study led by UA researchers. ...

dateSep 16, 2014 in Plants & Animals
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Study shows how chimpanzees share skills

Evidence of new behaviour being adopted and transmitted socially from one individual to another within a wild chimpanzee community is publishing on September 30 in the open access journal PLOS Biology. This is the first instance ...

dateSep 30, 2014 in Plants & Animals
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