Public Library of Science

The Public Library of Science (PLOS) was founded in 2000 by biomedical scientists Harold E. Varmus, Patrick O. Brown and Michael Eisen for the purpose of granting open access to the public about scientific research papers. An open letter was sent to scientific publishers encouraging them to all distribution of their research literature through an on-line publication like the National Library of Medicine's PubMed Central. In response to a less than receptive response, PLOS launched a nonprofit scientific and medical publishing venture in 2003. PLOS articles are available free on-line and appear immediately on the web site for no charge. PLOS received start-up funds from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundations and has received various other foundation endowments for their not for profit enterprise.

Address
185 Berry Street, Suite 3100 San Francisco, CA 94107 USA
E-mail
press@plos.org
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Identifying trends in article-level metrics

In late December 2013, PLOS ONE published an article from UK-based Psychologists Rob Jenkins and Christie Kerr titled "Identifiable Images of Bystanders Extracted from Corneal Reflections". Using high-resolution photography, ...

dateJun 04, 2015 in Computer Sciences
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Citizen science in New Mexico

Time traveling is one of my favorite things to do as a citizen scientist. As part of the New Mexico Site Steward Program, I walk slowly through an archeological site, the ground littered with the remains of pottery from people ...

dateAug 13, 2015 in Archaeology & Fossils
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How journals shape science and academia

No matter whether you study medicine or biology, law or art, neuroscience or history—there is one instrument that we all share: the journal. Learned journals play a pivotal role in science and academia. Publishing in scholarly ...

dateJun 01, 2015 in Other
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The ethical slipperiness of hoaxes

Hoaxes sure can stir up a lot of emotion, can't they? We tend to have a quick reaction to them, and they flush out differences in values quickly, too.

dateJun 01, 2015 in Other
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Communicating the consensus on climate change

Consider a medical analogy… If you saw 100 doctors about a mole that had appeared on your chest, and only three of them told you that it was benign, the chances are that you would probably do something about it, no matter ...

dateAug 10, 2015 in Environment
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Collective intelligence in online communication

Have you ever wondered what factors may shape the interactions we have in online chatrooms? With the advent of the Internet 20+ years ago, the ways in which we communicate have drastically changed, allowing us to easily interact ...

dateJun 23, 2015 in Social Sciences
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